Out of this World: Why science fiction speaks to us all

We have always allowed our imaginations to create other worlds as expressions of our wildest dreams, hopes and fears. The story and present state of our speculations are explored by Erik Davis, China Miéville, Adam Roberts and Tricia Sullivan. Chair, Sam Leith.

http://www.bl.uk/whatson/podcasts/podcast122743.html

Also huffduffed as…

  1. Out of this World: Why science fiction speaks to us all

    —Huffduffed by piamch8eec on June 21st, 2011

  2. Out of this World: Why science fiction speaks to us all

    —Huffduffed by adactio on June 22nd, 2011

  3. Out of this World: Why science fiction speaks to us all

    —Huffduffed by lesc on June 26th, 2011

  4. Out of this World - Out of this World: Why science fiction speaks to us all

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis on July 1st, 2011

  5. Out of this World: Why science fiction speaks to us all

    —Huffduffed by Kevan on July 7th, 2011

  6. Out of this World: Why science fiction speaks to us all

    —Huffduffed by briankuhl on December 6th, 2011

  7. Out of this World: Why science fiction speaks to us all

    —Huffduffed by marcjenkins on April 9th, 2012

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    http://www.theworld.org/2011/07/no-metaphors-allowed-china-mievilles-imagined-language/

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