eflclassroom / tags / science

Tagged with “science” (16) activity chart

  1. Radiolab: Words

    http://www.wnyc.org/shows/radiolab/episodes/2010/09/10

    It’s almost impossible to imagine a world without words. But in this hour of Radiolab, we try to do just that. We speak to a woman who taught a 27-year-old man the first words of his life, and we hear a firsthand account of what it feels like to have the language center of your brain wiped out by a stroke.

    —Huffduffed by eflclassroom

  2. Leonard Lopate: Please Explain - How We Read

    If it comes to you easily, being able to read is easy to take for granted. But reading is an extraordinarily complex process, one that researchers are still working to understand fully. On today’s Please Explain we look at the science of reading. Dr. Sally E. Shaywitz and Dr. Bennett A. Shaywitz are professors in Learning Development at the Yale University School of Medicine and Co-Directors of the Yale Center for Learning.

    —Huffduffed by eflclassroom

  3. What does technology want?

    Are new ideas and new inventions inevitable? Are they driven by us or by a larger force of nature?

    In this conversation recorded as part of the New York Public Library series LIVE from the NYPL, Steven Johnson (author of Where Good Ideas Come From) and Kevin Kelly (author of What Technology Wants) try to convince Robert that the things we make—from spoons to microwaves to computers—are an extension of the same evolutionary processes that made us. And we may need to adapt to the idea that our technology could someday truly have a mind of its own.

    —Huffduffed by eflclassroom

  4. The Good Show

    In this episode, a question that haunted Charles Darwin: if natural selection boils down to survival of the fittest, how do you explain why one creature might stick its neck out for another?

    The standard view of evolution is that living things are shaped by cold-hearted competition. And there is no doubt that today’s plants and animals carry the genetic legacy of ancestors who fought fiercely to survive and reproduce. But in this hour, we wonder whether there might also be a logic behind sharing, niceness, kindness … or even, self-sacrifice. Is altruism an aberration, or just an elaborate guise for sneaky self-interest? Do we really live in a selfish, dog-eat-dog world? Or has evolution carved out a hidden code that rewards genuine cooperation?

    —Huffduffed by eflclassroom

  5. Daniel Pink - How half your brain can save your job

    Author Dan Pink talks about the ideas in his book, A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future. He argues that the skills of the right side of the brain—skills such as creativity, empathy, contextual thinking and big picture thinking—are going to become increasingly important as a response to competition from low-wage workers overseas and our growing standard of living.

    http://www.econtalk.org/archives/_featuring/dan_pink/

    —Huffduffed by eflclassroom

  6. Daniel Pink - Drive

    Daniel Pink, author of Drive, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about drive, motivation, compensation, and incentives. Pink discusses the implications of using monetary rewards as compensation in business and in education. Much of the conversation focuses on the research underlying the book, Drive, research from behavioral psychology that challenges traditional claims by economists on the power of monetary and other types of incentive. The last part of the conversation turns toward education and the role of incentives in motivating or demotivating

    http://www.econtalk.org/archives/_featuring/dan_pink/

    —Huffduffed by eflclassroom

  7. Signing, Singing, Speaking: How Language Evolved : NPR

    Humans evolved a brain with an extraordinary knack for language, but just how and when we began using language is still largely a mystery. Early human communication may have been in sign language or song, and scientists are studying other animals to learn how human language evolved.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129155123

    —Huffduffed by eflclassroom

  8. How Science and Technology Influence Language : NPR

    Have you ever been Plutoed (demoted)? Is your inbox clogged with "bacn" (spam by personal request)? Are you a lifehacker (master at optimizing everyday routines)? Jonathon Keats, artist and author of Virtual Words, explains how science and technology influence language, and vice versa.

    http://www.npr.org/2010/12/24/132311754/How-Science-and-Technology-Influence-Language

    —Huffduffed by eflclassroom

  9. The Origins of Language

    Brain Science Podcast #30 is a discussion of Christine Kenneally’s book, The First Word: The Search for the Origin of Language.This episode concentrates on the emergence of the study of language evolution (evolutionary linguistics) from an area of area of inquiry that was banned in the 19th century to one that is flourishing and benefiting from new evidence from fields as diverse as genetics and studies in animal communication.

    —Huffduffed by eflclassroom

  10. Alice Gaby - on linguistics

    Talk about the relevance of linguistics and implications for neuroscience

    —Huffduffed by eflclassroom

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