Tagged with “radio” (84) activity chart

  1. Funemployed: The life of an artist in Australia - Books and Arts Daily - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Artist Justin Heazlewood’s candid book on what life is really like trying to be an artist in Australia.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/booksandartsdaily/funemployed3a-the-life-of-an-artist-in-australia/5598150

    —Huffduffed by lach

  2. Claire Dunn - Conversations with Richard Fidler - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Claire Dunn was feeling burned out by her job in the city, and took a year off - to live in the forest.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/conversations/claire-dunn/5500912

    —Huffduffed by lach

  3. 60 Words

    This hour we pull apart one sentence, written in the hours after September 11th, 2001, that has led to the …

    http://www.radiolab.org/story/60-words/

    —Huffduffed by jimftw

  4. 1984 (the year not the book) | Benjamen Walker’s Theory of Everything

    In 1984 your host was twelve years old and like George Orwell’s protagonist Winston Smith, he kept a diary, for the citizens of the future. For this special installment of Benjamen Walker’s Theory of Everything we travel back in time and give this diary a soundtrack. TV commercials, radio spots, movie clips – all sound from 1984 (the year, not the book). Find out what totalitarianism really sounds like.

    *********Click on the image for the whole story about this  installment**********

    Podcast: Download (Duration: 52:21 — 47.9MB)

    http://toe.prx.org/2014/04/1984-the-year-not-the-book/

    —Huffduffed by icathing

  5. Greg Fitzsimmons » Gavin McInnes

    VICE magazine co-founder, godfather of the hipster movement and recent Catholic Gavin McInnes talks about how his wild drinking days may be over now that he has

    http://www.gregfitzsimmons.com/2014/03/21/gavin-mcinnes/

    —Huffduffed by subtonic

  6. HBM019: The Other One Percent — Here Be Monsters

    In 2006, Pete Brook moved from England to California to study the museum at San Quentin State Prison. Through his research, he learned of America’s first-in-the-world rates of incarceration inside of prisons that are largely hidden from view.In 2008, Pete began Prison Photography, a blog that dissects images of prisons and prisoners.This week’s show is about Pete Brook’s 2011 journey across America to interview photographers, criminologists, and, most of all, the prisoners of New York’s Sing Sing Correctional Facility.Look at photos from the Sing Sing Workshop by Tim Matsui.Here Be Monsters is now on Stitcher!Music: Phantom Fauna

    http://www.hbmpodcast.com/podcast/hbm019-the-other-one-percent

    —Huffduffed by lach

  7. 129 Cars | This American Life

    We spend a month at a Jeep dealership on Long Island as they try to make their monthly sales goal: 129 cars. If they make it, they’ll get a huge bonus from the manufacturer, possibly as high as $85,000 — enough to put them in the black for the month. If they don’t make it, it’ll be the second month in a row.

    http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/513/129-cars

    —Huffduffed by icathing

  8. Teju Cole: A “Seething Intelligence” on a Long Journey

    http://www.radioopensource.org/teju-cole-a-seething-intelligence-on-a-long-journey/

    —Huffduffed by lach

  9. The Pandrogyne: Genesis Breyer P-Orridge | Love Radio

    Genesis Breyer P-Orridge is the founding fa/mo/ther of Industrial music, a performance artist, and a very, very, very devoted husband.

    Produced by Nick van der Kolk and Brendan Baker, with sound design by Brendan Baker.

    http://loveandradio.org/2013/12/the-pandrogyne/

    —Huffduffed by lach

  10. Acoustic architecture

    How does music speak to the buildings that house it?

    Music has always been a conversation with its environment, but from the 15th Century on, the craft became much more deliberate. And acoustic architecture has changed a lot since Dufay and the Gabrielis were composing their choral works for the Basilicas of Italy.

    Palaces, cathedrals, concert halls all got the bespoke treatment from composers like Bach and Beethoven. But as we reach the 20th Century and the machine-age, a different sonic logic starts to work. While the tradition was still maintained by people like Benjamin Britten, new minds like Edgard Varèse started to see other parallels between architecture and music. By the time we get to Iannis Xenakis, the architect-turned-composer, the idea of music and structure start to merge.

    And today the disciplines of architecture and music are spawning brand new hybrids—architects design music—musicians perform buildings.

    So, would you like to live in my song?

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/intothemusic/acoustic-architecture/4969332

    —Huffduffed by lach

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