djinna / tags / design

Tagged with “design” (3) activity chart

  1. No Excuse: Web Designers Who Can’t Code

    Some of the most important design decisions happen in code. In 2009, I gave a talk at the Build conference in Belfast with what I thought was a fairly uncontroversial premise: web designers should write code. Since then, the subject has sparked more than a few debates, including a particular heated pile-on when Elliot Jay Stocks tweeted that he was "shocked that in 2010 I’m still coming across ‘web designers’ who can’t code their own designs. No excuse." In a recent interview, Jonathan Ive said "It’s very hard to learn about materials academically, by reading about them or watching videos about them; the only way you truly understand a material is by making things with it." He’s talking about product design, but the principle is just as relevant to the Web (if not more so). "The best design explicitly acknowledges that you cannot disconnect the form from the material—the material informs the form…. Because when an object’s materials, the materials’ processes and the form are all perfectly aligned…. People recognize that object as authentic and real in a very particular way." As our industry grows and roles get more specialized, it’s possible to become a "web designer" without more than a cursory understanding of the fundamental building materials of the Web: the code. Is this just the price of progress? Are the days of the web craftsman soon to be in the past? Or is a hybrid approach to web design and development something worth preserve?

    • Jenn Lukas
    • Ethan Marcotte
    • Ryan Sims
    • Wilson Miner

    —Huffduffed by djinna 2 years ago

  2. Jeremy Keith on Using Blue

    In episode three of Using Blue we talk with Jeremy Keith of Clearleft about how HTML5 snuck up on him, responsive web design, catch phrases and catch phrases.

    We head down a great path of discussion with Jeremy while we talk about:

    • Buzz words in the industry.
    • HTML5.
    • Ajax.
    • How maybe UX and design are really the same thing.
    • Brian Rieger and his work on yiibu.com
    • How content management systems need to structure their content.
    • Responsive web design as the most exciting thing to hit the web, maybe ever.
    • Is Drupal a CMS or is it a framework?
    • How naming conventions in Drupal can cause confusion.
    • Who is Drupal really going after as their target audience.
    • The concept of Drupal distributions.
    • Native apps vs the mobile web with progressive enhancements. Jason Grigsby has a good post on how you can’t link to an app and the issues with that.
    • The mobile first approach that Luke Wroblewski writes and talks about and we love.
    • Getting into the browser as fast as possible. Essentially designing in the browser whenever possible.
    • Style tiles as an excellent communication tool in the design process.
    • The upcoming dConstruct conference. An excellent conference in Brighton, UK on September 2, 2011.
    • Also the Brighton Digital Festival.

    http://usingblue.com/episodes/jeremy-keith

    —Huffduffed by djinna 2 years ago

  3. Kerning, Orgasms And Those Goddamned Japanese Toothpicks

    Freud popularised the term, “The Narcissism of Minor Differences”, to describe how adjacent villages—identical for all practical purposes—would struggle to amplify their tiniest distinctions in order to justify how much they despised one other. So you have to guess how much he would have enjoyed design mailing lists. And, Perl.

    Truth is, to the untrained (un-washed, un-nuanced, un-Paul-Rand’d, and un-Helvetica’d) outsider, discourse in the design community can sometimes look a lot like a cluster of tightly-wound Freudian villages.

    So, how is the role of design perceived by the people who are using the stuff you make? What role (if any) should users expect in the process of how their world is made and remade? What contexts might be useful in helping us turn all of our obsessions into useful and beautiful work?

    Can an Aeron chair ever be truly ‘Black’? Will there ever be a way to get Marketing people to stop calling typefaces ‘fonts’? And, when, at last, will the international community finally speak as one regarding the overuse of Mistral and stock photos of foreshortened Asian women?

    By leveraging his uniquely unqualified understanding of design, Merlin will propose some promising patterns for fording the gap between end-users and the unhappy-looking people in costly European eyeglasses who are designing their world.

    Is there hope? Come to Brighton, pull up a flawlessly-executed mid-century-Modern seating affordance, and we’ll see what we can figure out together. One village to another.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/merlin-mann

    Merlin Mann is best known as the creator of 43folders.com, a popular American website about finding the time and attention to do your best creative work.

    —Huffduffed by djinna 3 years ago