davecoffin / tags / ted talk

Tagged with “ted talk” (4) activity chart

  1. Rebecca Saxe: How we read each other’s minds

    Sensing the motives and feelings of others is a natural talent for humans. But how do we do it? Here, Rebecca Saxe shares fascinating lab work that uncovers how the brain thinks about other peoples’ thoughts — and judges their actions.

    Rebecca Saxe studies how we think about other people’s thoughts. At the Saxelab at MIT, she uses fMRI to identify what happens in our brains when we consider the motives, passions and beliefs of others.

    —Huffduffed by davecoffin

  2. Sebastian Seung: I am my connectome

    Sebastian Seung is mapping a massively ambitious new model of the brain that focuses on the connections between each neuron. He calls it our "connectome," and it’s as individual as our genome — and understanding it could open a new way to understand our brains and our minds.

    Sebastian Seung is a leader in the new field of connectomics, currently the hottest space in neuroscience, which studies, in once-impossible detail, the wiring of the brain.

    —Huffduffed by davecoffin

  3. Tom Wujec on 3 ways the brain creates meaning

    Information designer Tom Wujec talks through three areas of the brain that help us understand words, images, feelings, connections. In this short talk from TEDU, he asks: How can we best engage our brains to help us better understand big ideas?

    Tom Wujec studies how we share and absorb information. He’s an innovative practitioner of business visualization — using design and technology to help groups solve problems and understand ideas. He is a Fellow at Autodesk.

    —Huffduffed by davecoffin

  4. Michael Merzenich on re-wiring the brain

    Neuroscientist Michael Merzenich looks at one of the secrets of the brain’s incredible power: its ability to actively re-wire itself. He’s researching ways to harness the brain’s plasticity to enhance our skills and recover lost function.

    Michael Merzenich studies neuroplasticity — the brain’s powerful ability to change itself and adapt — and ways we might make use of that plasticity to heal injured brains and enhance the skills in healthy ones.

    —Huffduffed by davecoffin