Andrew Fisher — How the web is going physical

In 2020 there will be nearly 10 times as many Internet connected devices as there are human beings on this planet. The majority of these will not have web browsers. When it comes to the “Internet of Things”, web designers and developers are uniquely placed to create, connect and produce innovative new ways for these devices to be used.

We are used to mashing up disconnected data sets, playing with APIs and designing for constantly moving standards in order to create compelling digital user experiences. “Old school” engineers are struggling to keep pace due to long processes for product and service design but as web creators we understand the value of rapid prototyping, user feedback and quick iterations. As developers, we play daily with a bewildering array of technologies that span networks, servers and user interfaces. As designers, we understand the nature of beautiful but usable technology.

These skills, and our innate understanding of how interconnectedness enhances and creates engaging user experiences, mean that web creators will be critical for the next generation of Internet enabled Things in our world. From a potplant that tweets when it needs water to crowd sourcing pollution data with sensors on people’s windows and visualising it on Google Maps these are the new boundaries of the web creator’s skills. Have you ever dreamt of sending your phone to the edge of space to take a picture of a country? Or how about a robot you can control via a web browser?

By exploring examples of things in the wild right now and delving into practical guidance for for getting started, this session will demonstrate how easy it is for web designers and developers to build Internet connected and aware Things.

About Andrew Fisher

Andrew Fisher is deeply passionate about technology and is constantly tinkering with and breaking something — whether it’s a new application for mobile computing, building a robot, deploying a cloud or just playing around with web tech. Sometimes he does some real work too and has been involved in developing digital solutions for businesses since the dawn of the web in Australia and Europe for brands like Nintendo, peoplesound, Sony, Mitsubishi, Sportsgirl and the Melbourne Cup.

Andrew is the CTO for JBA Digital, a data agency in Melbourne Australia, where he focuses on creating meaning out of large, changing data sets for clients. Andrew is also the founder of Rocket Melbourne, a startup technology lab exploring physical computing and the Web of Things.

http://www.webdirections.org/resources/andrew-fisher-how-the-web-is-going-physical/

Also huffduffed as…

  1. Andrew Fisher - How the web is going physical

    —Huffduffed by Clampants on October 25th, 2011

  2. Andrew Fisher - How the web is going physical

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw on October 25th, 2011

  3. Andrew Fisher — How the web is going physical

    —Huffduffed by adactio on October 26th, 2011

  4. Andrew Fisher - How the web is going physical

    —Huffduffed by olafursverrir on October 27th, 2011

  5. Andrew Fisher — How the web is going physical

    —Huffduffed by KurtL on October 28th, 2011

  6. Andrew Fisher - How the web is going physical

    —Huffduffed by tkadlec on October 29th, 2011

  7. Andrew Fisher - How the web is going physical

    —Huffduffed by chiefy81 on October 30th, 2011

  8. Andrew Fisher - How the web is going physical

    —Huffduffed by coldbrain on October 30th, 2011

  9. Andrew Fisher - How the web is going physical

    —Huffduffed by snapncrackle on November 1st, 2011

  10. Andrew Fisher - How the web is going physical

    —Huffduffed by liweichan on November 5th, 2011

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    —Huffduffed by rickfu on November 9th, 2011

  12. Andrew Fisher - How the web is going physical

    —Huffduffed by foxes96 on November 15th, 2011

  13. Andrew Fisher - How the web is going physical

    —Huffduffed by paperbits on November 27th, 2011

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    —Huffduffed by jt421 4 years ago

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    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 years ago

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    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/jeremy-keith-panel-hot-topics/

    —Huffduffed by thepru 2 years ago