axelintu / collective / tags / health

Tagged with “health” (10) activity chart

  1. On Point: In Conversation with Mark Bittman

    Food writer, food thinker Mark Bittman is one of the big voices relentlessly pushing, cajoling, inviting, instructing to change the way America eats. For our health, for the big world.

    He’s done it himself. Vegan ‘til six is his new mantra. Basically, eat plants all day, enjoy what you like in the evening. Your heart and health will thank you, he says. And so will an environment not asked to carry the groaning load of the way we eat now.

    He’s funny. He’s smart. He’s a good cook. He’s thinking about your plate and the planet.

    —Huffduffed by adactio 10 months ago

  2. Mining Books To Map Emotions Through A Century : Shots - Health News : NPR

    Anthropologists find that the use of "emotional" words in all sorts of books has soared and dipped across the past century, roughly mirroring each era’s social and economic upheavals. And psychologists say this new form of language analysis may offer a more objective view into our culture.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/04/01/175584297/mining-books-to-map-emotions-through-a-century

    —Huffduffed by adactio one year ago

  3. Facebook May Not Be So Friendly For Those With Low Self-Esteem : Shots - Health Blog : NPR

    They complain a bit more than everyone else, and they often share their negative views and feelings when face to face with friends and acquaintances. Researchers wondered whether those behavior patterns would hold true online.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2012/03/26/149237888/facebook-may-not-be-so-friendly-for-those-with-low-self-esteem

    —Huffduffed by adactio 2 years ago

  4. Mark Bittman on Taxing Bad Food to Subsidize the Good

    New York Times columnist Mark Bittman talks about taxing unhealthy foods. His article in the Times’ Sunday Review on July 24, “Bad Food? Tax It, and Subsidize Vegetables,” looks at why it’s so difficult to market healthy foods successfully.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/24/opinion/sunday/24bittman.html?_r=1

    —Huffduffed by adactio 2 years ago

  5. How Western Diets Are Making The World Sick : NPR

    Physician Kevin Patterson has treated patients in the Arctic, in Kandahar and on remote Pacific Islands. He says that Western ideas and the effects of urbanization are making people everywhere in the world both fatter and sicker.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/03/24/132745785/how-western-diets-are-making-the-world-sick

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 years ago

  6. Episode 11 | The Digital Life

    http://thedigitalife.com/2011/02/episode-11/

    —Huffduffed by banterability 3 years ago

  7. Food Rules for Healthy People and Planet

    For the past 20 years, Michael Pollan has been writing about the places where the human and natural worlds intersect: food, agriculture, gardens, drugs, and architecture.

    "The Omnivore’s Dilemma", about the ethics and ecology of eating, was named one of the ten best books of 2006 by the New York Times and the Washington Post.

    Join Michael Pollan at the RSA as he introduces his new book, "Food Rules" - and explores its key central message:

    "Eat food. Mostly plants. Not too much."

    Using those seven words as his guide, Michael Pollan provides a set of memorable everyday rules for eating wisely, gathered from a wide variety of sources: among them, mothers, grandmothers, nutritionists, anthropologists and ancient cultures.

    Speaker: Michael Pollan, the award-winning author of "In Defense of Food" and "The Omnivore’s Dilemma", contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine and the Knight Professor of Journalism at UC Berkeley.

    http://www.thersa.org/events/audio-and-past-events/2010/food-rules-for-healthy-people-and-planet

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 years ago

  8. Shot of Jaq: Life Online Part 1: The Balance

    With many of us spending increasing amounts of time plugged into our laptops and servers, in this first of a two-shot series, Jono Bacon and Stuart ‘Aq’ Langridge explore how we balance our online and offline lives, the heath implications, and the challenges that face us with mobile devices and how to get away.

    http://shotofjaq.org/2010/01/life-online-part-1-the-balance/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 4 years ago

  9. Michael Pollan, “Deep Agriculture”

    The benefit of a reformed food system, besides better food, better environment and less climate shock, is better health and the savings of trillions of dollars. Four out of five chronic diseases are diet-related. Three quarters of medical spending goes to preventable chronic disease. Pollan says we cannot have a healthy population, without a healthy diet. The news is that we are learning that we cannot have a healthy diet without a healthy agriculture. And right now, farming is sick…

    http://blog.longnow.org/2009/05/06/michael-pollan-deep-agriculture/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 4 years ago

  10. The future of food: can we eat our way out of total confusion?

    Has food been replaced by nutrients; and common sense by confusion? Once upon a time we ate food. Now we eat nutrients, embedded in food-like substances, like yoghurt fortified with omega-3 or bread rolls infused with anti-oxidants. Are foods like carrots, broccoli and chicken better for you before or after they take a trip to the food processing plant? Do we need more nutrients in our diet or is it all getting out of hand? And are scientists to blame for all this confusion? ABC´s Paul Willis hosts this lively public forum with: Michael Pollan, a food writer and professor of journalism at the University of California Berkeley and author of In Defence of Food; Professor Mark Adams, dean of agriculture, University of Sydney, an expert in sustainable agriculture; Dr Ingrid Appelqvist, team leader for the CSIRO´s designed food research program.

    http://www.abc.net.au/rn/bigideas/stories/2009/2448999.htm

    —Huffduffed by adactio 5 years ago