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Tagged with “writing” (76) activity chart

  1. To The Best of Our Knowledge: True Detective’s Nic Pizzolatto (extnded interview)

    HBO’s hit series "True Detective" is an uncanny blend of police procedural and metaphysical inquiry, set in the Louisiani bayous. In this exclusive interview, creator and writer Nic Pizzolatto tells Steve Paulson the backstory to the show, and provides a glimpse at what’s in store for season 2 (hint: it won’t take place in Louisiana).

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  2. Arthur C. Clarke

    A fortnightly biography of an intriguing individual from British history. Each episode in the podcast is a biography selected from the Oxford DNB - the authoritative collection of more than 56,000 lives of men and women from around the world who have shaped Britain’s history.

    http://global.oup.com/oxforddnb/info/freeodnb/pod/

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  3. How Churchill went atomic and currents in science writing: The Guardian Books Podcast

    Has the gilt rubbed off the golden age of science writing? And why has an award-winning writer turned his focus from scientific biography to political history? Graham Farmelo, who won the Costa biography award with his life of the quantum genius Paul Dirac, joins us to discuss his book about the "hidden" history of Winston Churchill and the nuclear bomb. He explains why Churchill’s role in the history of atomic weapons should not be underestimated, introduces us to some of the eccentrics who briefed him, and tells how the term "atomic bomb" was invented by a novelist years before they even existed.

    We also hear from Uta Frith, one of the panel judging the Royal Society’s Winton prize for science writing, about the books on this year’s longlist. And Guardian science writer Ian Sample – a former Winton shortlistee – explains why the last thing he wants to do when he’s relaxing is read a book about science.

    http://www.theguardian.com/books/audio/2013/sep/20/churchill-atomic-currents-science-writing-podcast

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  4. Ian McMillan Presents the Verb - Food Writing

    This week The Verb is looking at Food Writing. Ian McMillan’s guests include the novelist Emma Jane Unsworth, Caroline Hobkinson, an artist who creates ‘Experimental Dining Experiences’ and the food writer Diana Henry, who owns 4,000 cookbooks. We also have The Bookshop Band, who have written a song for us based on a book with food at its centre.

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  5. Margaret Atwood on Science Fiction, Dystopias, and Intestinal Parasites

    In the latest episode of Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy Margaret Atwood explains how to invent your own religion, reveals which dystopian future she fears most, and discusses her new novel MaddAddam.

    http://www.wired.com/underwire/2013/09/geeks-guide-margaret-atwood/

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  6. Why Designers need to Craft Words Not Pixels

    In this interview, Jeffrey Zeldman Founder of Happy Cog, reveals the importance of crafting copy and using that as a way to create great user experiences.

    http://drt.fm/jeffrey-zeldman-happy-cog-interview-why-designers-need-to-craft-words-not-pixels/

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  7. Interview: Neil Gaiman, Author Of ‘The Ocean At The End Of The Lane’ : NPR

    Neil Gaiman says his latest novel, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, started out as a short story that just didn’t stop growing. Originally, it was also a simple story about a young boy —€” but morphed into a much darker tale about being a child in dangerous territory.

    http://www.npr.org/2013/06/15/191353158/gaimans-new-ocean-is-no-kiddie-pool

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  8. Shut Your Analog Hole - The New Disruptors - Mule Radio Syndicate

    Cory Doctorow (@doctorow) is a essayist, novelist, blogger, and co-editor of BoingBoing, and he is exhausting. The man is a production machine, churning out excellent book after excellent book as if writing were a job instead of something to agonize and procrastinate over. As of this writing, his latest books are Homeland and Pirate Cinema, and, with Charlie Stross, he wrote Rapture of the Nerds. Cory has also long been an advocate for the personal ownership of culture, demanding corporations and governments keep their hands off what we make and their noses out of our individual use and modification of media and hardware. To that end, he has fought endless wars against restrictive legislation.

    Websites we mention: Cory worked for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), a non-profit that defends individual rights and freedoms. Cory was part of the Humble Ebook Bundle, which put together several science fiction and fantasy books into a single name-your-price bundle in which the buyer chose how much of their payment went to authors and how much to three charities. Amazon has a price-matching arrangement when authors pick a 70%-royalty arrangement that allows them to match the lowest ebook price anywhere on the Net for any book they sell for Kindle. BookScan tracks retail sales through integration with point-of-sale and online sales systems. My father and I run Books & Writers, a book-rank tracking service. Amazon has provided BookScan data to authors who register with them. At least one book distributor in 1996 was relying on IBM’s PROFS on a mainframe. Cory documented in painstaking detail how his With a Little Help story collection was funded and produced. Artist friends created a set of four covers for print editions so that one could choose among them. The book was designed by John D. Berry, a friend of mine and one of the world’s best typographers. (His wife is Eileen Gunn, a science-friend and incubator of science-fiction writers.) There’s a difference between the barter economy and the gift economy, and Cory explains the distinction. Andy Baio, who is part of the life’s blood of creativity on the Internet, released Kind of Bloop, a collection of 8-bit music, that had an homage of a famous Miles Davis photo as part of the cover. Despite it rather obviously being precisely within the reasonable confines of transformative work, it would have required exensive litigation. Andy settled to avoid destroying his family finances. The partly crowdfunded movie Stripped had a second round of money raising to cover the clearance rights for some of the copyrighted material the filmmakers wanted to include. Cory pointed out that the Stanford Center for Internet and Society can help a filmmaker who wants to assert fair-use rights over material obtain the errors and omissions insurance required to have a film shown in a theater and released in other ways. Ursula K. LeGuin likely wouldn’t have a found a publisher who would have been willing to let her quote from The Beatles’ “A Little Help from My Friends” today, a critical component of her The Lathe of Heaven. In fact, the 1980 PBS movie of the book couldn’t be re-released for many years because of both negotiating with the original cast and crew, and obtaining rights. The Beatles’ original version of the song was replaced with a cover in the re-release. (Cory notes that LeGuin doesn’t like fair use of her own work.) Aereo is a Barry Diller-controlled company that is selling access to tiny HDTV antennas over the Internet to skirt rules about re-broadcasting. It’s clever. So clever that a dissenting judge in an appeals panel was rather unhappy about it. Fox filed takedown notices under the DMCA for Cory’s book Homeland on various sites asserting it was the rightsholder, as opposed to being the rightsholder for its TV series Homeland. Jaron Lanier once told tales of virtual-reality goggles and the future. He now tells different stories. The Infocom Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (H2G2) game may still be played. The Incomparable podcast did an episode on Infocom games. Sony once infected computers with a rootkit to manage copy protection for its music CDs. The software hid itself and degraded Windows, and it took a long while for Sony to tell the truth and make amends. Defibrillators can be easily hacked. The Analog Reconversion Discussion Group was formed to plug the “analog hole,” which was a way to copy digital playback through an analog output. Scott Turow wrote a spectacularly uninformed and self-serving Op-Ed in the New York Times that conflated a number of different factors, mostly specious and relatively absurd, about how authors were getting a squeeze on royalties. The issue at hand was the Supreme Court allowing the importation of foreign editions of books. Such editions may be sold cheaply abroad, but also are often made more cheaply and thus not as appealing to American buyers. Turow is head of the Author’s Guild, which purports to speak for all authors, but only a tiny number of writers belong relative to all published authors. (I used to.) The Registrar of Copyrights may approve temporary and limited exemptions to the DMCA, but these are reviewed every three years. RealDVD got pulled from the market by RealNetworks in order to avoid disturbing studio partners. Kaleidescape makes servers that let users rip CDs, DVDs, and Blu-Ray and then space shift them around a house. “No, that’s just perfectly normal paranoia, everyone in the universe has that.” Many people who are competent suffer from Imposter Syndrome. A comic came out after Cory and I spoke about the day jobs of poets.

    http://www.muleradio.net/newdisruptors/24/

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  9. FrontRow:Kim Cattrall on stage. Cornelia Parker. Brian Aldiss. Gwyneth Lewis.

    Mark Lawson reviews Kim Cattrall in Sweet Bird of Youth by Tennessee Williams and talks to artist Cornelia Parker, novelist Brian Aldiss & for Cultural Exchange, poet Gwyneth Lewis.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/frontrow

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  10. Lauren Beukes on The Bat Segundo Show

    Subjects Discussed: Predicting the future, whether 2013 is more of an apocalyptic year than 2012, killer bunnies, laughing rats, H.P. Lovecraft, the best zombie dramatizations, explanation in narrative, trusting the reader with interesting definitions of how the world works, the Greek tragedy of time travel, killing Hitler, Kate Atkinson’s Life After Life, criss-crossing timelines, Looper, finding spontaneity in a careful foundation, E.L. Doctorow’s description of writing, developing the close third person perspective, working against the sophisticated predator stereotype, the catharsis of hurting mean characters, T.C. Boyle, fictitious injuries, time periods that are defined by pop cultural references, Studs Terkel, Forrest Gump, women’s rights, McCarthyism, connections between American and South African history, spies and informants, surveillance society, Todd Akin, Candyman, Spencer Tracy explaining baseball to Katharine Hepburn in Woman of the Year, interviewing real people, not understanding sports, the difficulty of forgiving people for political atrocities, Sarah Lotz, objecting to fictitious murders, living in Chicago, why the Midwest is an ideal setting for an American novel, the tendency to invoke Detroit with symbolism, parallels between Hillbrow and Detroit, Mark Binelli’s Detroit City is the Place to Be, Charlie LeDuff’s Detroit: An American Autopsy, the U.S. Radium Corporation’s exploitation of women, paying researchers, Radium Girls, quoting directly from a 1936 story in the Milwaukee Sentinel, Mad Dog Maddux, naming your company after an employer’s fictitious creation to secure a job, the annoyance of getting minor details right, John Banville, the invention/research spectrum, location scouting, women who are objectified by her scars, Murderball, the sex lives of the injured, characters defined by the interior, physical description, how visual photos serve as emotional reference, why fictitious sociopaths drink Canadian Club, Amity Gaige’s Schroeder, A Clockwork Oraange, Al Capone, Velázquez’s Las Meninas, and rabid eating.

    http://www.edrants.com/segundo/lauren-beukes-bss-501/

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