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Tagged with “technology” (264) activity chart

  1. One-On-One Conversations: Ingrid Burrington and James Bridle

    The first in this series features James Bridle and Ingrid Burrington, discussing "The Black Chamber". As technology advances and becomes increasingly networked and integrated with our daily lives, it tends towards a greater invisibility, a seamlessness and an unreadability. From the Cipher Bureau to Room 641A, from the datacenter to the iPhone, from the drone command module to the shipping container, the black boxes of the network litter the contemporary landscape. Unable to see inside them, we construct fantasies about their use, develop new ways of thinking about them, and attempt to probe them through techniques legal, technical, and magical. Eyebeam Residents Ingrid Burrington and James Bridle will explore the aesthetic and imaginative space of the black box, and outline some of their own practices for approaching them. http://anything2mp3.com/

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  2. The power of positive sci-fi

    For a couple of generations, it’s been a truism that good science fiction is grim science fiction. Technology is out of control, democracy is failing, the environment ruined. Think Hunger Games, Minority Report, The Matrix, and Blade Runner, all the way back to 1984. But science fiction writer and astrophysicist David Brin believes we’ve gotten too fond of these bummers. “It’s so easy to make money with a tale that says: ‘Civilization is garbage. Our institutions never will be helpful. Your neighbors are all useless sheep,’” he laments. “’Now enjoy a couple of characters running around shooting things and having adventures in the middle of a dystopia.’”

    Dystopias are bad? That’s heresy for science fiction. But a few people are starting to agree with him, like Neal Stephenson, the author of Cryptonomicon and Snow Crash. A few years ago, Stephenson was on a panel discussion with Arizona State University President Michael Crow, and Stephenson started complaining that there were no big scientific projects to inspire people these days. Crow shot back, “You’re the ones slacking off!” In Crow’s view, it was the writers who weren’t pulling their weight, supplying the motivating visions for science and technology.

    From that discussion, Crow and Stephenson have collaborated on The Center for Science and the Imagination at ASU. And Stephenson founded a group called Project Hieroglyph, which recruits science fiction authors to write more optimistically about the future. “I guess I had never given science fiction writers enough credit of being leaders of innovation,” Stephenson says. The writers who contribute to Project Hieroglyph don’t have to consult with scientists or engineers, but doing so “shows they’re on the right track.” Stephenson says. Only three rules: no hyperspace, no holocausts and no hackers. Coming from Stephenson, the bard of hackers, that’s quite a challenge.

    http://www.studio360.org/story/power-of-positive-sci-fi/

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  3. Anki robotics founder Boris Sofman on why it’s a small leap from zippy toys to self-drive cars

    This week on Tech Weekly with Aleks Krotoski we discuss the reasons behind a rush by the UK government to get new data laws on the statute before the summer recess of parliament. Aleks speaks to Jim Killock executive director of the Open Rights Group about the dangers of rushing such important legislation and why this might endanger our civil liberties and rights as consumers.

    Aleks is also joined by the Guardian tech team in the form of Samuel Gibbs and Shiona Tregaskis to discuss Amazon’s recent application in the US to test out its drone delivery system Prime Air and Guardian games editor Keith Stuart give his top five tips for those who have just returned to the world of gaming and are nervous about picking up a controller.

    Finally Guardian technology editor Charles Arthur meets Boris Sofman, founder of the robotics company Anki. Boris discusses the recent launch of his Anki Drive toy cars and why the technology running is not so different to the technology behind Google’s self-drive car.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2014/jul/16/anki-robotics-podcast

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  4. 5by5 | CMD+Space #103: Everything in Moderation, with Matt Haughey

    This week Myke is joined by Matt Haughey. They talk about Metafliter’s past, it’s troubles with advertising, accidental crowd-funding and the site’s future.

    Make sure that you stick around to the end of the show for a big announcement.

    http://5by5.tv/cmdspace/103

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  5. Is NASA Ready to Make the Leap to a Manned Mission to Mars?

    What technologies, budget, and partners would NASA needed for a successful manned mission to Mars?

    http://sciencefriday.com/segment/06/13/2014/is-nasa-ready-to-make-the-leap-to-a-manned-mission-to-mars.html

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  6. Cory Doctorow on intellectual property in a digital age

    In a keynote speech for The Literary Conference 2014, author and renowned digital publishing pioneer Cory Doctorow talks about his creative experiments on and offline, and addresses head-on the thorny question of ‘Intellectual Property in a Digital Age’.

    http://craphound.com/?p=5227

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  7. Marketplace Tech for Monday, June 9, 2014 | Marketplace.org

    On today’s show, Ben Howard, VP of Programming for Gamespot, with a preview of what to expect from this week’s E3 video game conference. Plus, Ariel Waldman, the founder of spacehack.org, talks about citizen science and how the tech industry is changing the scientific community. And hear more about a town in Pakistan that creates 80% of the world’s soccer balls.  A group of notable economists got together to use it as a laboratory to test how best to introduce innovation.

    http://www.marketplace.org/shows/marketplace-tech-report/marketplace-tech-monday-june-9-2014

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  8. The Digital Human: Broken

    Aleks Krotoski charts how digital culture is moulding modern living. Each week join technology journalist Aleks Krotoski as she goes beyond the latest gadget or web innovation to understand what sort of world we’re creating with our ‘always on’ lives.

    Aleks Krotoski explores how our unwillingness to break things has changed out relationship with technology.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/dh

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  9. EconTalk - Benkler on Net Neutrality, Competition, and the Future of the Internet

    EconTalk Episode with Yochai Benkler Hosted by Russ Roberts

    Yochai Benkler of Harvard University talks to EconTalk host Russ Roberts about net neutrality, access to the internet, and innovation. Benkler argues in favor of net neutrality and government support of broadband access. He is skeptical of the virtues of new technology (such as the iPad) fearing that they will lead to less innovation. The conversation closes with a discussion of commons-based peer production—open source software and Wikipedia.

    http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2010/04/benkler_on_net.html

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  10. Transmission #29: Between the Buns - Goodstuff FM

    Today on Transmission: App.net can’t pay full-time, Skynet is here—and it’s in China, Google Maps gains uber update, MLB’s first walk-off video review win, Conference speaking with Sam Kapila and more.

    http://goodstuff.fm/transmission/29

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