adactio / tags / language

Tagged with “language” (113) activity chart

  1. In ‘Um’ Or ‘Uh,’ A Few Clues To What We’re Saying — And Who’s Saying It

    Linguist Mark Liberman, who works at the University of Pennsylvania, says the use of "um" or "uh" can provide signs about the speaker’s gender, language skills and life experience.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. 99% Invisible - 114: Ten Thousand Years

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/ten-thousand-years/

    In 1990, the federal government invited a group of geologists, linguists, astrophysicists, architects, artists, and writers to the New Mexico desert, to visit the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. They would be there on assignment.

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the nation’s only permanent underground repository for nuclear waste. Radioactive byproducts from nuclear weapons manufacturing and nuclear power plants. WIPP was designed not only to handle a waste stream of various forms of nuclear sludge, but also more mundane things that interacted with radioactive materials, such as tools and gloves.

    WIPP, which is located deep in the New Mexico desert, was designed to store all of this radioactive material and keep us all safe from it.

    Eventually, WIPP will be sealed up and left alone. Years will pass and those years will become decades. Those decades will become centuries and those centuries will roll into millennia. People above ground will come and go. Cultures will rise and fall. And all the while, below the surface, that cave full of waste will get smaller and smaller, until the salt swallows up all those oil drums and entombs them. Then, all the old radioactive gloves and tools and little bits from bombs –all still radioactive– will be solidified in the earth’s crust for more than 200,000 years. Basically forever.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Interview: Ammon Shea, Author Of ‘Bad English: A History of Linguistic Aggravation’ : NPR

    A new book looks at words that self-appointed linguistic police have declared contraband, like "lunch," which should be a verb, and "balding," a participle formed from an adjective instead of a verb.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/06/03/318574907/from-lunch-n-to-balding-adj-some-words-are-just-bad-english

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Using The Wisdom Of Crowds To Translate Language : NPR

    Linguists are looking to crowd-sourcing to solve the problem of translating lesser-known dialects. The plan is to use social networks to link human translators with groups like relief agencies — and even businesses. It’s a technique that worked after the Haitian earthquake.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=127940249

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. The History of English Podcast Episode 3: The Indo-European Family Tree

    A look at the family tree of Indo-European languages and the relationship of English to those related languages. The closest relatives of English are highlighted, including the Germanic languages, Latin and Greek. We explore the background of English from the first Indo-Europeans to the first Anglo-Saxons in Britain.

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2013/08/04/episode-3-the-indo-european-family-tree-4/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. The History of English Podcast Episode 2: The Indo-European Discovery

    The story of the discovery of the ancient language which gave rise to most of the languages of Europe, including English.

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2013/08/04/episode-2-the-indo-european-discovery-5/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Language Evolution, 2013

    The year in language. Cronut. Vape. Twerk. Sharknado. We’ll look at the language that went large in 2013.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Episode 1: Introduction | The History of English Podcast

    In this introductory episode, we look at the emergence of English as a global language and the evolution of the language from its Germanic origins.

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2013/07/31/episode-1-introduction/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Does Language Bring Us Together Or Pull Us Apart?

    Mark Pagel says early humans developed language as a tool to cooperate. But with thousands of different languages, Pagel says language also exists to prevent us from communicating outside our tribal groups.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Spark 233 | Spark with Nora Young | CBC Radio

    Beauty and Brains.

    Beautiful Sound.

    Because Noun.

    24-hour Music.

    Dramatizing the Internet.

    Photo Organization.

    http://www.cbc.ca/spark/episodes/2013/12/01/233/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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