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Tagged with “internet” (115) activity chart

  1. Face it: The internet of things isn’t going to develop like the web

    We spend a lot of time on the show discussing standards and how data should move easily around the internet of things, but this week Tom Coates tells us that vision isn’t realistic.

    http://gigaom.com/2014/08/12/face-it-the-internet-of-things-isnt-going-to-develop-like-the-web/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Design for how the world should work

    As the Internet is increasingly embedded into our physical world, it’s important to start designing for physical and intentional interactions with interfaces to supplement the passive, data-gathering interactions — designing smart devices that service us in the background, but upon which we also can exert our will.

    In this episode, Josh Clark (in an interview) and Tim O’Reilly (in a keynote) both address the importance of designing for contextual awareness and physical interaction. Clark stresses that we’re not facing a challenge of technology, but a challenge of imagination. O’Reilly argues that we’re not paying enough attention to the aspects of people and time in designing the Internet of Things, and that the entire system in which we operate is the user interface — as we design this new world, we must think about user needs first.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Spark 246, CBC Radio

    Are you ready to run your own cloud? Be your own Windows XP tech support? Watch total strangers play video games? Debate whether it’s possible to design things for forever on the internet?

    http://www.cbc.ca/spark/episodes/2014/03/30/spark-246/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. EconTalk - Benkler on Net Neutrality, Competition, and the Future of the Internet

    EconTalk Episode with Yochai Benkler Hosted by Russ Roberts

    Yochai Benkler of Harvard University talks to EconTalk host Russ Roberts about net neutrality, access to the internet, and innovation. Benkler argues in favor of net neutrality and government support of broadband access. He is skeptical of the virtues of new technology (such as the iPad) fearing that they will lead to less innovation. The conversation closes with a discussion of commons-based peer production—open source software and Wikipedia.

    http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2010/04/benkler_on_net.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Internet History Podcast Chapter 1, Part 3 – Netscape, The Big Bang

    Netscape launches and is a smashing success. Jim Barksdale officially comes on as CEO. Netscape fights off legal threats from the NCSA and the University of Illinois. Despite it’s young age and lack of profits, Netscape files to go public in THE historic IPO of the era. Flush with cash, flush with fame, Netscape girds for battle with a new foe: Microsoft.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2014/02/chapter-1-part-3-netscape-the-big-bang/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Rebecca MacKinnon: Let’s take back the Internet!

    In this powerful talk from TEDGlobal, Rebecca MacKinnon describes the expanding struggle for freedom and control in cyberspace, and asks: How do we design the next phase of the Internet with accountability and freedom at its core, rather than control? She believes the internet is headed for a "Magna Carta" moment when citizens around the world demand that their governments protect free speech and their right to connection.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/rebecca_mackinnon_let_s_take_back_the_internet

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Internet History Podcast Chapter 1, Part 2 – The Creation of Netscape

    Marc Andreessen heads out to Silicon Valley. He hooks up with startup legend Jim Clark. They decide to form a company, Netscape, to build upon Mosaic’s previous success. They “get the band back together” by recruiting most of the original Mosaic development team. Netscape Navigator is developed. The company hustles to establish itself before other, larger competitors catch on to the opportunity that is the web browser market.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2014/01/chapter-1-part-2-netscape-the-big-bang/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Internet History Podcast Chapter 1, Part 1 – Mosaic

    A young Marc Andreessen and a team of programmers at the NCSA on the campus of the University of Illinois create and publish the Mosaic browser, thereby creating the world wide web’s first killer app. Mosaic enjoys meteoric, overnight discuss. But the higher ups at the NCSA take the project away from the “kids” who created it. Examining Mosaic as the “trial run” for the product that would eventually be called Netscape Navigator.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2014/01/mosaic/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. David Weinberger on knowledge

    David Weinberger, senior researcher at Harvard Law’s Berkman Center for the Internet & Society and Co-Director of the Harvard Library Innovation Lab at Harvard Law School, discusses his new book entitled, “Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren’t the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Room.” According to Weinberger, knowledge in the Western world is taking on properties of its new medium, the Internet. He discusses how he believes the transformation from paper medium to Internet medium changes the shape of knowledge. Weinberger goes on to discuss how gathering knowledge is different and more effective, using hyperlinks as an example of a speedy way to obtain more information on a topic. Weinberger then talks about how the web serves as the “room,” where knowledge seekers are plugged into a network of experts who disagree and critique one another. He also addresses how he believes the web has a way of filtering itself, steering one toward information that is valuable.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2012/02/21/david-weinberger/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Gabriella Coleman on the ethics of free software

    Gabriella Coleman, the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy in the Art History and Communication Studies Department at McGill University, discusses her new book, “Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking,” which has been released under a Creative Commons license.

    Coleman, whose background is in anthropology, shares the results of her cultural survey of free and open source software (F/OSS) developers, the majority of whom, she found, shared similar backgrounds and world views. Among these similarities were an early introduction to technology and a passion for civil liberties, specifically free speech.

    Coleman explains the ethics behind hackers’ devotion to F/OSS, the social codes that guide its production, and the political struggles through which hackers question the scope and direction of copyright and patent law. She also discusses the tension between the overtly political free software movement and the “politically agnostic” open source movement, as well as what the future of the hacker movement may look like.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2013/01/08/gabriella-coleman-2/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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