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Tagged with “cooking” (67) activity chart

  1. Is Fusion a Bad Word?, The Food in “Game of Thrones,” Hot Pot — Good Food — KCRW

    Jonathan Gold explains why the term ‘fusion’ is no longer useful. Plus, he reviews a hot pot restaurant in the San Gabriel Valley. Elina Shatkin explores the food scenes in Game of Thrones.

    http://www.kcrw.com/news-culture/shows/good-food/is-fusion-a-bad-word-the-food-in-game-of-thrones-hot-pot

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  2. David Chang | Heritage Radio Network

    Momofuku’s umami king, David Chang, is constantly questioning the institution of taste, and always aiming to progress in the culinary world. This week on Taste Matters, Mitchell Davis invites David into the studio to talk about his expanding restaurant empire, neglected flavors, and agriculture. Though David’s food is often described as bold, hear how David uses the subtlety of Japanese cuisine in his cooking. Find out why contemporary diners are obsessed with the idea of umami, and how David brought kimchi into the food vernacular. How do palates differ internationally? With restaurants in Australia, Canada, and beyond, David has learned the minute differences between the dining public’s tastes. Learn about Japan’s rich farming traditions, and hear how the Internet has been detrimental to food culture. You don’t want to miss this week’s edition of Taste Matters! Thanks to our sponsor, Fairway Market. Today’s break music has been provided by Jack Inslee.

    ‘Everything is fusion, and there are only two types of cuisine- good food and bad food. And we’re striving for the former.’ [4:05]

    ‘Taste matters not just in fine dining, but everywhere.’ [5:00]

    ‘If your goal is to stay the same, then you’re going to regress… Our goal is to reach a goal that we are never going to reach.’ [15:00]

    ‘The Japanese have been farming for thousands of years… They have a culture and history of food that we can’t even imagine.’ [21:20]

    — David Chang on Taste Matters

    http://www.heritageradionetwork.org/episodes/4612-Taste-Matters-Episode-97-David-Chang

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  3. Knives: the new bling

    Bling, the Urban Dictionary tells me, is an onomatopoeic representation of light bouncing off a diamond. Or a Bob Kramer original hand-made chef’s knife, which goes for $2000 and up. Of course some people might be able to justify spending that kind of cash on what is, after all, one of the key tools of the trade … if your trade happens to be cooking. But my guest today, Peter Hertzmann, says he sees lots of knives, maybe not quite that expensive, hanging on the wall in people’s kitchens, unused. “Kitchen knives”, he told this year’s Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery, are “the new bling”.

    Peter teaches knife skills, has written extensively on the topic, and one of the things he is adamant about is that you never chop, you slice. Even if you’re pretty handy with a blade, you can probably learn a thing or two from his video Three Aspects of Knife Skills. I know I did.

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/knives/

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  4. BBC Food Programme: Knives

    The knife, that most coveted of kitchen tools, is Sheila Dillon’s subject to explore this week.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/foodprog

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  5. Pasta

    There’s supposed to be this whole mystique surrounding “proper” pasta: how to cook it, which shape with what sauce, how to eat it, all that. And if you’re not born to it, you’ll never really understand it. Well, maybe not, but with a little effort you can get a whole lot closer to authenticity. Maureen Fant, a writer and scholar who has lived in Rome since 1979, has a new book out with her collaborator Oretta Zanini de Vita, making their Encyclopedia of Pasta a tad more kitchen-friendly. Sauces and Shapes: Pasta the Italian Way is a curious blend of the constrained and the relaxed … just like Italy. One of the things they’re relaxed about is shapes for sauces, which came as a bit of a surprise. One of the things they’re not relaxed about is overcooked pasta, which did not.

    There was so much else we could have talked about, and the book is a one of those cookbooks that is as much a good read as a manual of instruction. As for my beloved cacio e pepe, fashionable or not, I am greatly encouraged by the the news that “[t]his is not a dish to make for a crowd … The smaller the quantity, the better the result.” That’s all the encouragement I need.

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/pasta/

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  6. Anthony Bourdain and Michael Ruhlman: How I Learned To Cook | 92Y Talks

    https://soundcloud.com/92y/anthony-bourdain-michael-ruhlman

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  7. Food tours and cooking classes

    It is quite amazing how popular food tours and cooking classes are in Italy. When in Rome, many people seem to want to eat, and cook, like a Roman. Well, not entirely, and not like some Romans. I spoke to Francesca Flore, who offers both tours and cooking classes, and she reserved some choice words for those quintessential Roman dishes based on the famous quinto quarto, the fifth quarter of the carcass. Or, less obtusely, offal.

    Francesca told me that she’s always been interested in food, and that while working in London she decided to take herself off to Australia to study Cooking and Patisserie at the Cordon Bleu School in Sydney. Back in Rome, she put all that knowledge to use catering private parties and branching out into food tours and cooking classes.

    We talked about what people want, what they get, and how she views the past and future of Italian food.

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/food-tours-and-cooking-classes/

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  8. BBC Food Programme: Southern Cooking & Sean Brock

    Provenance and pleasure, history and health - Radio 4’s weekly look at food. Making sense of food, from the kitchen and canteen, to the farm and factory. We place food in its historical and cultural context; call to account policy makers and industry decision makers; and celebrate the sheer pleasure of good food.

    Richard Johnson is in South Carolina to meet Charleston chef, Sean Brock, who is on a mission to revive ingredients and flavours not experienced for hundreds of years. It’s a story that involves an intricate "food tattoo", one of America’s biggest private seed collections, a hog roast and "pick picking" and bowls of delicious peas, beans, rice, grits and fried chicken.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/foodprog

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  9. Here’s how a kid from Long Island became a king of Japanese ramen | Public Radio International

    Living in Japan, Ivan Orkin started eating ramen — lots of it. But when he moved back to New York in the 90s, he says, "I just yearned for ramen. It just became this crazy thing where I was jonesing for ramen all the time." So when he returned to Japan, he opened a ramen joint — and impressed a Japanese food critic.

    http://www.pri.org/stories/2014-03-26/heres-how-kid-long-island-became-king-japanese-ramen

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  10. Arab Israeli Celebrity Chef Aims To Foster Peace Through Cooking : The Salt : NPR

    Nof Atamna-Ismaeel, an Arab Israeli, is the latest winner of the Israeli reality cooking show Master Chef. She plans to open a cooking school to bring Arabs and Israelis together at the table.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/04/09/301028044/arab-israeli-celebrity-chef-aims-to-foster-peace-through-cooking

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