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Tagged with “advertising” (6) activity chart

  1. Unfinished Business 73: We’ve reached peak burrito

    A weekly discussion show about the business end, the sharp end of web, design and creative industries.

    Jeremy Keith joins me on this, episode 73 of Unfinished Business. Although I try to steer clean of provoking him by not talking about moon landings, we disagree about just about everything else. Fish tacos, things that scientists haven’t done that I think they should’ve and what makes advertising to fascinating to me and hateful to him. It’s a lively show. There are sparks. I think you’ll like it.

    http://unfinished.bz/73

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  2. Denied Permission for an Emergency Landing at Clavius

    Special guest Jim Coudal joins John Gruber to discuss Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey”, The Deck network and the state of online advertising, and the just-completed Webstock conference in Wellington, New Zealand.

    http://www.muleradio.net/thetalkshow/32/

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  3. Pizza Delicious Bought An Ad On Facebook. How’d They Do? : Planet Money : NPR

    What happened when two guys who sell pizza out of a window in New Orleans decided to buy a Facebook ad —€” and what it says about the state of social-media advertising.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2012/05/16/152736597/pizza-delicious-bought-an-ad-on-facebook-howd-they-do?ft=1&f=93559255

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  4. The Friday Podcast: Who Killed Lard? : Planet Money : NPR

    You rarely see lard on menus. There aren’t shelves and shelves of it in every supermarket. In this country, we’ve sort of lost touch with the once beloved pig fat.

    On today’s podcast, we ask — who killed lard? Was it Upton Sinclair? His novel, The Jungle, contained this memorable passage about the men who cook the lard:

    "…and as for the other men, who worked in tank rooms full of steam, and in some of which there were open vats near the level of the floor, their peculiar trouble was that they fell into the vats; and when they were fished out, there was never enough of them left to be worth exhibiting,— sometimes they would be overlooked for days, till all but the bones of them had gone out to the world as Durham’s Pure Leaf Lard!"

    Or should we blame William Procter and James Gamble? It was their company which created a new alternative to lard — the "pure and wholesome" Crisco.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2012/01/06/144806987/the-friday-podcast-who-killed-lard

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  5. Clearing The Air

    In January, South America’s largest city officially banned outdoor advertising. Billboards, neon signs, bus-stop ads, even the Goodyear blimp - all were suddenly illegal. Folha de Sao Paulo reporter Vinicius Galvao describes seeing his city as though for the first time.

    http://www.onthemedia.org/2007/apr/20/clearing-the-air/

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  6. Bill Wasik on Internet-Driven Culture

    Remember Susan Boyle? "David After Dentist"? "Keyboard Cat"? All recent internet sensations, and all well on their way to being forgotten for the next thing. Bill Wasik is a senior editor at Harper’s magazine. He’s credited with organizing the first flash mob, in New York City in 2003. He points to similar Web–driven hits (and his own online pranks) to show how the internet has sped up the stream of culture. But not just for celebrities and funny videos: music, news, politics, advertising. Wasik says it all becomes "nanostories" that tumble over each other — "a churning culture of distraction." Bill Wasik looks at how the digital revolution is changing culture in his book, "And Then There’s This: How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture." He spoke at Town Hall in Seattle on June 16, 2009.

    http://kuow.org/program.php?current=LI

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