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Tagged with “networks” (22) activity chart

  1. Social Network Portability — dConstruct Audio Archive

    Why is it that every single social network community site makes you re-enter all your personal profile info (name, email, birthday, URL etc.) and re-add all your friends? With new social networks being launched nearly every week, the problem of social network fatigue has gone from being a geeky early adopter problem to being much more widespread.

    http://archive.dconstruct.org/2008/socialnetworkportability

    —Huffduffed by wolverina

  2. Unexpected Item In The Bagging Area

    In the 1980s geophysicist Andy Hildebrand was working for Exxon analysing seismic survey data. Hildebrand created digital signal processing software that took recordings of waves travelling through the ground from dynamite explosions and processed them to find hidden pockets of oil.

    In 2013 the software has a new name and a very different purpose. You can hear its output on the radio, on YouTube and on X-Factor. No longer a tool for geophysicists but for pop stars. Auto-Tune uses the same process that identified underground rock layers to make vocals sound pitch perfect. To an algorithm there is no difference between Kanye’s voice and an oil deposit.

    Auto-Tune isn’t the only technology shaping our lives in unexpected ways. In this talk we’ll look at our software mediated world, it’s consequences and our role in it as creators.

    http://2013.dconstruct.org/conference/dan/

    Dan W. makes things. Sometimes those things are made of atoms. Sometimes they are made of bits.

    Display Cabinet is a mixture of both. And even the purely digital services Arrivals and When Should I Visit? are designed to make smooth your journey through the world of atoms and matter by giving you easy access to information from the networked world of bits.

    Dan works at Pervasive Media Studio in Bristol. You can find his scrapbook on Tumblr where he documents the seemingly science-fictional collisions of technology and society that he sees happening all around.

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw

  3. Admiral Shovel and the Toilet Roll — dConstruct Audio Archive

    It begins to look as if we might have been wrong. All those predictions driving us forward throughout history have brought us finally to the unexpected realisation that the future is, suddenly, no longer what it used to be. Oops.

    http://archive.dconstruct.org/2012/admiralshovel

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  4. Beyond Mobile: Making Sense of a Post-PC World

    Native applications are a remnant of the Jurassic period of computer history. We will look back on these past 10 years as the time we finally grew out of our desktop mindset and started down the path of writing apps for an infinite number of platforms. As the cost of computation and connectivity plummets, manufacturers are going to put ‘interactivity’ into every device. Some of this will be trivial: my power adaptor knows it’s charging history. Some of it will be control related: my television will be grand central for my smart home. But at it’s heart, we’ll be swimming in world where every device will have ‘an app’. What will it take for us to get here, what technologies will it take to make this happen?

    This talk will discuss how the principles of the open web must apply not only to prototocols but to hardware as well. How can we build a ‘DNS for hardware’ so the menagerie of devices has a chance for working together?

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/jenson/

    Scott Jenson used to work at Apple, developing the Human Interface guidelines and working on the Newton, no less. He also worked at Symbian and Google so he knows all about mobile devices of all kinds.

    Scott is currently Creative Director at Frog Design where he has been writing about the coming zombie apocalypse.

    —Huffduffed by jane

  5. The Man Working To Reverse-Engineer Your Brain

    Our brains are filled with billions of neurons. Neuroscientist Sebastian Seung explains how mapping out the connections between those neurons might be the key to understanding the basis of things like personality, memory, perception, ideas and mental illness.

    http://www.npr.org/2012/02/29/147190092/the-man-working-to-reverse-engineer-your-brain

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  6. Jeremy Rifkin: How Lateral Power is Transforming Energy, the Economy, and the World.

    Economist and trend-spotter Jeremy Rifkin predicts that the evolution of energy production and distribution — from fossil fuels to more decentralized renewable energy — will transform the global economy. He joins us to discuss his latest book, "The Third Industrial Revolution: How Lateral Power is Transforming Energy, the Economy, and the World."

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  7. Why Cities Keep Growing, Corporations and People Always Die, and Life Gets Faster

    From edge.org: http://edge.org/conversation/geoffrey-west

    For the past few years Geoffrey West, a physicist former president of SantaFe Institute has been calling for "a science of how city growth affects society and environment".

    After years of focusing on scalability of cities and urban environments, West, is now is bringing "some of the powerful techniques, ideas, and paradigms developed in physics over into the biological and social sciences". He is looking at a bigger picture and asking the following question: "to what extent can biology and social organization (which are both quintessential complex adaptive systems) be put in a more quantitative, analytic, mathemitizable, predictive framework so that we can understand them in the way that we understand ‘simple physical systems’?’

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  8. Spark: Ben Fullerton on Design for Solitude (Full Interview)

    I’ve been thinking about the importance of solitude quite a lot, lately. Recently, I came across a talk given by Ben Fullerton, who is a director of user experience at Method Design, in San Francisco. In the talk, he argues that the default for designers is assuming that connection is good, and that maybe, instead, designers should think about how their work can support solitude, at least some of the time. Ben cited some examples of new ways of thinking about design to support values such as solitude and mindfulness, including former Spark guest, Jaron Lanier’s book, You Are Not a Gadget, and the upcoming Wisdom 2.0 conference. The conversation reminded me of an interview I did with William Deresiewicz, back in 2009. He argued that we may be losing our ability to be alone, in our ‘always on’ culture. I’d love to get your thoughts on how we might begin to think about designing for things like solitude and attention, instead of just connection.

    http://www.cbc.ca/spark/2011/01/full-interview-ben-fullerton-on-design-for-solitude/

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  9. The Net Delusion: Does free information mean free people?

    At the start of the twenty-first century we were promised that the internet would liberate the world. We could come together as never before, and from Iran’s ‘twitter revolution’ to Facebook ‘activism’, technological innovation would spread democracy to oppressed peoples everywhere. We couldn’t have been more wrong. Morozov destroys this myth, arguing that ‘internet freedom’ is an illusion, and that technology has failed to help protect people’s rights. Not only that – in many cases the internet is actually helping authoritarian regimes. From China to Russia to Iran, oppressive governments are using cyberspace to stifle dissent: planting clandestine propaganda, employing sophisticated digital censorship and using online surveillance. We are all being manipulated in more subtle ways too – becoming pacified by the net, instead of truly engaging. This event marks the publication of Evgeny Morozov’s new book The Net Delusion: How Not to Liberate The World.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  10. Everything The Network Touches

    The work we’re collectively doing—opening up gradually all of human information and media, making it recombinable, helping people create and share their work—is a huge unspoken, sexy, world-redefining mission.

    It’s a mission that many of us have become blasé about, almost unaware of. It’s a project so large that it’s hard to get a grasp on. And the next few years are going to get even more interesting as the network pervades physical objects and environments, sensing and manifesting information in the real world.

    It’s time to recognise the scale of the project we have in front of us, the breadth of the material we have to work with, and the possibilities of design within it. All of human knowledge, creativity—even the planet itself—is our canvas.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/tom-coates

    Tom Coates is a technologist and writer, focused on the shape of the web to come and on developing new concepts that thrive in it. He’s worked for many prominent web companies including Time Out, the BBC and Yahoo! where he was Head of Product for the Brickhouse innovation team. He’s most known for the Fire Eagle location-sharing service, and for his work on social software, future media and the web of data.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

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