adactio / Jeremy Keith

An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England working with Clearleft.

I built Huffduffer.

There are thirty people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (2467) activity chart

  1. Malcolm Gladwell on Desert Island Discs

    Kirsty Young asks castaways to choose eight records, a book and a luxury to take with them to the mythical desert island.

    Malcolm Gladwell, writer, is interviewed by Kirsty Young for Desert Island Discs.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/did

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Anne Neuberger: Inside the NSA - The Long Now

    The NSA reaches out

    Of her eight great-grandparents, seven were murdered at Auschwitz.

    “So my family’s history burned into me a fear of what occurs when the power of a state is turned against its people or other people.”

    Seeking freedom from threats like that brought her parents from Hungary to America.

    By 1976 they had saved up to take their first flight abroad.

    Their return flight from Tel Aviv was high-jacked by terrorists and landed at Entebbe Airport in Uganda.

    Non-Jewish passengers were released and the rest held hostage.

    The night before the terrorists were to begin shooting the hostages, a raid by Israeli commandos saved most of the passengers.

    Anne Neuberger was just a baby in 1976.

    “My life would have looked very different had a military operation not brought my parents home. It gives me a perspective on the threats of organized terror and the role of intelligence and counterterrorism.”

    When she later entered government service, she sought out intelligence, where she is now the principal advisor to the Director for managing NSA’s work with the private sector.

    The NSA, Neuberger said, has suffered a particularly “long and challenging year” dealing with the public loss of trust following the Snowden revelations.

    The agency is reviewing all of its activities to determine how to regain that trust.

    One change is more open engagement with the public.

    “This presentation is a starting point."

    “My family history,” she said, "instilled in me almost parallel value systems – fear of potential for overreach by government, and belief that sometimes only government, with its military and intelligence, can keep civilians safe. Those tensions shape the way I approach my work each day.

    I fully believe that the two seemingly contradictory factors can be held in balance.

    And with your help I think we can define a future where they are.”

    The National Security Agency, she pointed out, actively fosters the growth of valuable new communication and computing technology and at the same time “needs the ability to detect, hopefully deter, and if necessary disable lethal threats.”

    To maintain those abilities over decades and foster a new social contract with the public, Neuberger suggested contemplating 5 tensions, 3 scenarios, and 3 challenges.

    The tensions are…

    1) Cyber Interdependencies (our growing digital infrastructure is both essential and vulnerable); 2) Intelligence Legitimacy Paradox (to regain trust, the NSA needs publicly understood powers to protect and checks on that power); 3) Talent Leverage (“the current surveillance debates have cast NSA in a horrible light, which will further hamper our recruiting efforts”); 4) Personal Data Norms (the growing Internet-of-things—Target was attacked through its air-conditioning network—opens vast new opportunities for tracking individual behavior by the private as well as public sector); 5) Evolving Internet Governance (the so-far relatively free and unpoliticized Internet could devolve into competing national nets).

    Some thirty-year scenarios… 1) Intelligence Debilitated (with no new social contract of trust and thus the loss of new talent, the government cannot keep up with advancing technology and loses the ability to manage its hazards); 2) Withering Nation (privacy obsession hampers commercial activity and government oversight, and nations develop their own conflicting Internets); 3) Intelligent America (new social contract with agreed privacy norms and ongoing security assurance).

    Initiatives under way from NSA…

    1) Rebuild US Trust (move on from “quiet professionals” stance and actively engage the public); 2) Rebuild Foreign Trust (“extend privacy protections previously limited to US citizens to individuals overseas”); 3) Embrace Collective Oversight (reform bulk collection programs in response to the President’s Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board).

    As technology keeps advancing rapidly, the US needs to stay at the forefront in terms of inventing the leading technical tools to provide public services and maintain public security, plus the policy tools to balance civil liberties with protection against ever-evolving threats.

    “My call to action for everyone in this audience is get our innovative minds focussed on the full set of problems.”

    A flood of QUESTION CARDS came to the stage, only a few of which we could deal with live.

    Anne Neuberger wanted to take all the questions with her to share with NSA colleagues, so Laura Welcher at Long Now typed them up.

    I figure that since the questioners wanted their questions aired on the stage to the live and video audience, they would like to have them aired here as well.

    And it would be in keeping with the NSA’s new openness to public discourse.

    Ms. Neuberger agreed…

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02014/aug/06/inside-nsa/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. In ‘Um’ Or ‘Uh,’ A Few Clues To What We’re Saying — And Who’s Saying It

    Linguist Mark Liberman, who works at the University of Pennsylvania, says the use of "um" or "uh" can provide signs about the speaker’s gender, language skills and life experience.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. The Last Man on the Moon - The Naked Scientists

    We look at the latest news from the stars, planets and other heavenly bodies. Plus interviews with professional astronomers and the answers to your space science questions.

    In this special edition, the Last Man on the Moon, Gene Cernan, talks exclusively to Richard Hollingham about the final step, mortality and his disappointment about the way the space programme has developed.

    http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/podcasts/astronomy/show/20140810/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Face it: The internet of things isn’t going to develop like the web

    We spend a lot of time on the show discussing standards and how data should move easily around the internet of things, but this week Tom Coates tells us that vision isn’t realistic.

    http://gigaom.com/2014/08/12/face-it-the-internet-of-things-isnt-going-to-develop-like-the-web/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Molly Ringwald: Mothering in Captivity on The Moth

    The mother of a second grader struggles to understand her daughter’s behavior.

    http://themoth.org/posts/stories/mothering-in-captivity

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. No More Reservations: Exclusive Restaurants Require Tickets Instead : The Salt : NPR

    High-end restaurants featuring rock star chefs are starting to turn to tickets to stem the tide of no-shows. In the future, going out to eat could become a lot like going to a sold-out concert.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/08/05/337834577/no-more-reservations-exclusive-restaurants-require-tickets-instead

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Lauren Beukes and her broken monsters

    Lauren Beukes is a sensational author, her knowledge of the arts and culture is a force to be reckoned with. Her love of new people, places, conversation and exchange of ideas is what makes her such a rich and colourful person to have on the show. This shines from the pages of her new book BROKEN MONSTERS. It’s been a year since The Shining Girls which catapulted Beukes into wider recognition so how does it feel writing something of such stature after the success of The Shining Girls? Lauren also sheds new light on new cities, old cities and what she loves the most about London, Cape town and her newest city of all, Detroit.

    https://soundcloud.com/bookdpodcast/lauren-beukes-and-her-broken-monsters

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Dan Saffer – Big Considerations from Microinteractions » UIE Brain Sparks

    User Experience is really all about delighting your users. You want them to accomplish tasks with ease and not encounter any roadblocks that are a direct result of your design. Many of the delightful things about an app or interface go unnoticed because they are the tiniest of features. These microinteractions can set the tone for your users and dictate the feel and performance of your design.

    Dan Saffer is an expert on microinteractions. In fact, he wrote the book on it. He says that microinteractions essentially operate based on triggers, rules, feedback, loops, and modes. For example, when you engage a scrollbar, how fast does it scroll? Or when you click a volume up button, what percent increase is each click?

    Just think of a car. In the broadest terms, a car is a car. But the styling of the interior, leather seats, placement of cupholders, and how the in car stereo system works all help differentiate one car from another. These are often subtle differences, but as with microinteractions, these small differences are crucial to the overall feel and experience.

    http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2014/08/01/dan-saffer-big-considerations-from-microinteractions/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Out Of The Strings Of A Fiddle, The Melodies Of Cold, Craggy Isles : NPR

    The Shetland Islands, a cluster of rocks in the North Sea, is an unusual place. Wealthy from offshore oil, Shetlanders are yet wedded to ancient traditions. And they play the fiddle like no one else.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/08/01/337164757/out-of-the-strings-of-a-fiddle-the-melodies-of-cold-craggy-isles

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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