adactio / Jeremy Keith

An Irish web developer living in Brighton, England working with Clearleft.

I built Huffduffer.

There are twenty-nine people in adactio’s collective.

Huffduffed (2443) activity chart

  1. Is Big Pharma Testing Your Meds on Homeless People? — Matter — Medium

    How the destitute and the mentally ill are being used as human lab rats.

    https://medium.com/matter/did-big-pharma-test-your-meds-on-homeless-people-a6d8d3fc7dfe

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Fireside Chat: Brian Eno

    Electronic music didn’t start with Brian Eno, but it was certainly never the same after him. On Roxy Music’s first two albums he helped make synthesizers and tape effects part of a rock lineup, pricking the ears of future synth-pop creators such as Human League. As a solo artist he forged a new genre, which he dubbed ambient music, before effectively becoming a one-man genre himself, lending touches to Genesis (where he’s credited with “Enossification”), John Cale, and David Bowie during his golden Berlin period. There wasn’t much in the way of experimental 70s music that wasn’t made a little odder by Eno’s touch. But that touch could also be a multiplatinum one, as he showed as a producer for U2 in the mid-80s and Coldplay 20 years later. In the 90s he created perhaps the most widely heard music of all: the six-second start-up sound for Microsoft’s Windows 95 operating system. Typically mischievous, he later let it be known that he’d created it on a Mac.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. The Collective episode 61 - Gavin Rothery - Part 2

    Here’s Part 2 to our monstrously long conversation with Gavin Rothery. Picking up right where we left off in Part 1, we discuss the emotional power of a great film, shout out tons of book recommendations, and the importance of a good story to any film or game.

    https://soundcloud.com/the-collective-podcast/the-collective-ep61-gavin-rothery-part-2

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Smashing Physics: how we discovered the Higgs boson - podcast | Science | theguardian.com

    This week Guardian science editor Ian Sample meets particle physicist Professor Jonathan Butterworth from University College London to talk about his new book Smashing Physics. It’s an insider’s account of one of the most momentous scientific breakthroughs of our times: the discovery of the Higgs boson announced in July 2012.

    Jon discusses what it’s like to work on the largest science experiment in history and why such ambitious – and costly – endeavours benefit us all.

    Next up, British Association media fellow Nishad Karim reports from the UCL Symposium on the Origins of Life. Be it life on Earth or life elsewhere in the universe, this symposium covered it all with a range of experts from cosmology and biology to meteorology, discussing some very big questions. Where did we come from? Did life begin on Earth or elsewhere? Are we alone?

    Nishad spoke to several of the presenters including Dr Zita Matins, an astrobiologist from Imperial College London, and Dr Dominic Papineau, a geochemist from UCL. Dr Martins is a specialist in finding organic material essential for life in meteorites, and Dr Papineau looks for old organic life a little closer to home, analysing Earth rocks.

    Other speakers included Dr Francisco Diego, a UCL cosmologist, who discussed the life of the universe itself from beginning to now, 13.8bn years later.

    And finally, Ian asks Guardian environment writer Karl Mathiesen whether 2014 will be the hottest year on record.

    http://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2014/jul/28/smashing-physics-higgs-boson-jon-butterworth-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Dawn of the Planet of the Apes • Silver Screen Queens • JellyStyle

    The Simian virus from 2011’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes has wreaked havoc on humans, and let apes advance. Ten years later, low on fuel, humans start to infringe on ape territory.

    The Hosts

    Katie Molloy

    Katie is a geek, teacher, former film student and lifelong fangirl whose interests include Joss Whedon, Harry Potter, chocolate, and Darren Criss. She also reviews movies on her blog, Silver Screen Queen.

    Melissa Savage

    A movie-loving nerd from Canberra, Melissa works a day job in the government while moonlighting as a blogger, podcast host and grad student by night. She’s William Riker’s number one fan girl.

    http://jellystyle.com/podcasts/silverscreenqueens/60

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Is Fusion a Bad Word?, The Food in “Game of Thrones,” Hot Pot — Good Food — KCRW

    Jonathan Gold explains why the term ‘fusion’ is no longer useful. Plus, he reviews a hot pot restaurant in the San Gabriel Valley. Elina Shatkin explores the food scenes in Game of Thrones.

    http://www.kcrw.com/news-culture/shows/good-food/is-fusion-a-bad-word-the-food-in-game-of-thrones-hot-pot

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. BBC - Podcasts and Downloads - The Infinite Monkey Cage

    Award winning science/comedy chat with Brian Cox, Robin Ince and guests. Witty, irreverent look at the world according to science with physicist Brian Cox and comedian Robin Ince. New Series starting on BBC Radio 4, Monday July 7th at 4.30pm (repeated on Tuesday evenings at 11pm) for 6 weeks.

    Brian Cox, Robin Ince and guests, Katy Brand, Dr Kevin Fong and Philip Ball ask whether science needs war to drive it?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/timc

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Design for how the world should work

    As the Internet is increasingly embedded into our physical world, it’s important to start designing for physical and intentional interactions with interfaces to supplement the passive, data-gathering interactions — designing smart devices that service us in the background, but upon which we also can exert our will.

    In this episode, Josh Clark (in an interview) and Tim O’Reilly (in a keynote) both address the importance of designing for contextual awareness and physical interaction. Clark stresses that we’re not facing a challenge of technology, but a challenge of imagination. O’Reilly argues that we’re not paying enough attention to the aspects of people and time in designing the Internet of Things, and that the entire system in which we operate is the user interface — as we design this new world, we must think about user needs first.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Game On: Charles Stross - The Laundry File

    The author, Charles Stross joins Adam to talk about the latest book in the Laundry Files, ‘The Rhesus Chart’ and Sam Clay from VG 247 is on hand for a brief round-up of the news.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/jot

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Unfinished Business special: Rumpus On The Planet Of The Apes with Brendan Dawes and Jeremy Keith

    Before we go any further, I need to let people know that there is absolutely zero business content in the show this week. (Thousands of people are thinking now, “when is there ever?”) That‘s because this is a spoiler filled ‘Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes’ cinema special episode with my guests and film buff friends Brendan Dawes and Jeremy Keith.

    It’s a wild show. We ask whether there should be a new Oscar category for performance capture and if Andy Serkis should win everything? We talk about the other seven Planet Of The Apes films, starting with the original five and if Tim Burton’s 2001 reimagining is a guilty pleasure. Then we get in deep with the new ‘Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes’ before asking ourselves the important questions; When will apes wear clothes? When and how will humans become mute, and why should you avoid watching an apes film in Rhyl?

    Even if you’re not an Apes aficionado, I think you’ll enjoy listening to this episode of Unfinished Business as much as we enjoyed making it, which was a lot.

    http://unfinished.bz/79

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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