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Tagged with “lecture” (14) activity chart

  1. Adam Kuper: Dr Seligman and the Islanders: considering Charles Seligman and his work

    Speaker(s): Professor Adam Kuper Chair: Professor Deborah James

    Recorded on 1 March 2012 in Thai Theatre, New Academic Building.

    Adam Kuper, who has written widely on the history and theory of anthropology, introduces the work of Charles Seligman, founder of LSE Anthropology, pioneer of fieldwork techniques, and medical doctor who devised means of treating servicemen for shell-shock. He gives insights into Seligman’s journals and research notes housed in LSE Library, and provides commentary on Jonathan Miller’s documentary about the 1898 Torres Straits expedition: ‘Dr Miller and the Islanders’, which reveals the problematic racist overtones of the views of late 19th century anthropology. The documentary will be shown after Adam Kuper’s talk.

    Olivia Seligman, radio producer and member of the Seligman family, and students from LSE Anthropology will read extracts from Seligman’s journals and letters.

    LSE public lecture audio podcast and video media player page

    http://www2.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=1426

    —Huffduffed by RobertsonCrusoe 2 years ago

  2. What’s in a copy? Gustavo Lins Ribeiro 14 Sep 2011

    Talking Anthropology » Podcast » TA35-What’s in a copy

    In this episode you hear the keynote speech of Gustavo Lins Ribeiro – a famous Brasilian Anthropologist – with the title “What’s in a copy“. He gave this speech at the biannual conference of the german society of ethnology in the austrian academy of science (http://www.tagung2011.dgv-net.de/).

    The introduction to the speaker is held by Prof. Andre Gingrich and after the talk we had time for a short interview.

    [The publication of this material on Talking Anthropology is authorized by Gustavo Lins Ribeiro.]

    Original post: http://www.talkinganthropology.org/2011/09/26/ta35-whats-in-a-copy/

    —Huffduffed by RobertsonCrusoe 2 years ago

  3. Huxley Memorial Lecture: Johannes Fabian

    "CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND THE QUESTION OF KNOWLEDGE"

    Friday 4 February 2011 at 5.30pm in the Stevenson Theatre, Clore Education Centre, the British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG.

    Abstract:

    Although it helps to be aware of what philosophers think about knowledge anthropologists can neither simply relegate their epistemological problems to, nor find solutions in, philosophy. In anthropology knowing what and how we know is a practical, not just a theoretical problem, one we face in all phases of our work, from field research to writing (and teaching). Historical recollections of debates since the nineteen-sixties are followed by giving attention to two aspects of the knowledge-question in our discipline: Knowledge of what? and Whose knowledge? Guided by reflections on knowledge and survival, the lecture will end with an attempt to assess the present and future state of the question.

    Huffduffed from http://backdoorbroadcasting.net/2011/02/johannes-fabian-cultural-anthropology-and-the-question-of-knowledge/

    —Huffduffed by RobertsonCrusoe 2 years ago

  4. Claude Lévi-Strauss: Mythical Thought and Social Life | Graduate Council Lectures | UC Berkeley

    MYTHICAL THOUGHT AND SOCIAL LIFE

    Claude Lévi-Strauss, Laboratoire d’Anthropologie Sociale du Collège de France et de l’ École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales

    September 26, 1984

    Claude Lévi-Strauss: is a French anthropologist who demonstrated how myths encode categories of native thought. The lecture centers itself around mythical thought and social life

    ABOUT CLAUDE LEVI-STRAUSS Claude Lévi-Strauss was a French social anthropologist who became a leading scholar in the structural approach to social anthropology. He is famous for theorizing that if social scientists can understand man’s mental structures they can then build a study of man which is as scientific as the laws of gravity.

    Graduate Council Lectures

    http://grad.berkeley.edu/lectures/event.php?id=226&lecturer=155

    —Huffduffed by RobertsonCrusoe 2 years ago

  5. Claude Lévi-Strauss: The Birth of Historical Societies | Graduate Council Lectures | UC Berkeley

    Claude Lévi-Strauss, Laboratoire d’Anthropologie Sociale du Collège de France et de l’ École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales

    HITCHCOCK LECTURE SERIES: September 24, 1984

    Claude Lévi-Strauss is a French anthropologist who transformed the study of kinship, marriage and family from a descriptive to a theoretical field, showing how the world’s family and kinship structures are connected both through the symbolic processes of the human mind into universal principals of reciprocity in human social life.

    ABOUT CLAUDE LEVI-STRAUSS Claude Lévi-Strauss was a French social anthropologist who became a leading scholar in the structural approach to social anthropology. He is famous for theorizing that if social scientists can understand man’s mental structures they can then build a study of man which is as scientific as the laws of gravity.

    http://grad.berkeley.edu/lectures/event.php?id=225&lecturer=155

    —Huffduffed by RobertsonCrusoe 2 years ago

  6. Malinowski Lecture: Rane Willerslev, “Frazer Strikes Back From The Armchair”

    This event was recorded on 13 May 2010 in Old Theatre, Old Building The question which runs throughout this talk can be stated in stark form: is it a mistake to take our interest in an ethnographic phenomenon in the direction of an empirical investigation, when what is really needed with respect to its clarity is an imaginative contemplation of it? It is my overall argument that this is indeed the case and that the Malinowskian recourse to empirical evidence as the ultimate criterion for anthropological knowledge is misguided. Some phenomena dealt with by anthropologists are beyond empirical experience. As examples, I take two classical topics - the ‘soul’ and ‘ritual blood sacrifice’. I will show how both are essentially metaphysical issues, not empirical ones. Understanding them, therefore, is not a question of advancement in the actual material practice of fieldwork, but of the power of the scholar’s speculative imagination. This finds an echo in Frazer, the last survivor of the old ‘armchair school’. His style of anthropology was marked by a deliberate speculative interrogation of ethnography - a process whereby abstract thinking gives force and meaning to ethnographic observations.

    Event listing: http://goo.gl/hUNpA

    —Huffduffed by RobertsonCrusoe 3 years ago

  7. The Tycoon and the Tough: towards a comparative anthropology of urban marginality

    Speaker: Dr Joshua Barker Chair: Professor Chris Fuller

    This event was recorded on 7 May 2009 in Hong Kong Theatre, Clement House, LSE

    Anthropologists often use key figures, such as the street tough, the child witch, and the flâneur, as a means to elucidate, personify, and critique underlying dynamics of social and cultural transformation. It is a method that is widely used, but seldom scrutinised. In this lecture Joshua Barker uses examples from his research in the slums of Bandung, Indonesia, to argue that this method can make a powerful contribution to a comparative anthropology of urban marginality.

    Event Posting: http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/LSEPublicLecturesAndEvents/events/2009/20090311t1852z001.htm

    —Huffduffed by RobertsonCrusoe 4 years ago

  8. 1991 Frazer Lecture - Godfrey Lienhardt on Frazer’s Science and Sensibility

    The Frazer Lecture on the legacy of James George Frazer, which Godfrey Lienhardt suggests is greater in the field of literature (through its influence on people like T.S. Eliot in ‘the Waste Land’ than on the science of anthropology.

    The James George Frazer Memorial Lecture for 1991 was delivered at the University of Cambridge by Godfrey Lienhardt on 5 March 1992, well after he had retired from the University of Oxford. The event was chaired by Dr. Alan Macfarlane and was filmed by Humphrey Hinton, using a video 8 camera. The lecture lasts about 45 minutes.

    This podcast is the audio portion of the digitized video recording available online at https://www.dspace.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/38

    —Huffduffed by RobertsonCrusoe 4 years ago

  9. 2007 Hopper Lecture - Mosse on Anthropology’s Role in International Development

    David Mosse, Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London (UK), delivered the 15th annual David Hopper Lecture at the University of Guelph on November 6, 2007.

    Mosse explored the link between anthropology and international development, and outlined the critical role he believes anthropologists can play in these efforts.

    The annual David Hopper Lecture is made possible through an endowment IDRC made to the University of Guelph in 1992 in honour of its founding president. This annual academic lecture on an international development issue is hosted at the University of Guelph.

    Listen to the lecture online at http://www.idrc.ca/en/ev-119208-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html.

    [Note: The sound quality during the introductions is quite poor. To proceed to Mosse’s formal lecture, advance to the five and half minute mark (5:30)]

    —Huffduffed by RobertsonCrusoe 4 years ago

  10. 2007 Radcliffe-Brown Lecture - Anthropology is Not Ethnography

    This lecture took place on 14 March 2007

    Professor Timothy Ingold, FBA, University of Aberdeen

    Anthropology has been shrinking. Once an inclusive inquiry into the conditions of human life, it has increasingly turned inwards on itself. One reason for this shrinkage lies in the identification of anthropology with ethnography. Such identification leads us to think of observation as a means to the end of description. The lecturer will aim to show, to the contrary, how description not just literary but graphic and performative - can be re-embedded in observation. Overturning the relation between observation and description will enhance anthropology’s potential to engage with biology, psychology and archaeology on the great questions of the origins and destiny of humankind.

    Download the entire paper here: http://www.proc.britac.ac.uk/tfiles/825683A/154p069.pdf.

    —Huffduffed by RobertsonCrusoe 4 years ago

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