Tagged with “space” (101) activity chart

  1. The Last Man on the Moon - The Naked Scientists

    We look at the latest news from the stars, planets and other heavenly bodies. Plus interviews with professional astronomers and the answers to your space science questions.

    In this special edition, the Last Man on the Moon, Gene Cernan, talks exclusively to Richard Hollingham about the final step, mortality and his disappointment about the way the space programme has developed.

    http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/podcasts/astronomy/show/20140810/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. How to fly to Alpha Centauri

    Talking about building an interstellar space ship makes you sound like a sci-fi fan who’s lost touch with the real world. Unless you’re Mae Jemison, a former astronaut — the first African-American woman in space. Then you might legitimately wonder, “How in the hell do you get to another star system?”

    Jemison actually needs to answer that question; she’s the head of 100 Year Starship, an organization the home page of which boldly commands, “Let’s make human interstellar travel capabilities a reality within the next hundred years.”

    “That time frame is reasonable, why?” she asks rhetorically. “If you said ten years — ‘Nah, we know that’s not long enough.’ If you said 500 years, people would say, ‘I can kick back for another two to three hundred years because I don’t have to worry about it.’ One hundred years is close enough."

    The problem: space is big, and our current rocket technology isn’t cutting it. “If you’re travelling with technology we can already conceive, like say the Voyager spacecraft, it’s going to take about 80,000 years to travel a distance to our nearest neighboring star," says Marc Millis, the head of the Tau Zero Foundation. “And it is going 0.00006 times the speed of light.” Nuclear-powered spacecraft might go much faster, and have their proponents, but are politically and environmentally dangerous: no one wants to risk a nuclear meltdown during liftoff.

    The heads of yet another interstellar organization, Starship Century, think they are on the right track. James Benford is president of a company that does microwave research; his identical twin brother Gregory is an astrophysicist at the University of California, Irvine. The Benfords make a strong case for a technology right out of a science fiction novel. The technology is the beam sail, and the book is Rocheworld, written by Robert Forward in 1982. “[It’s] a very solid scientific concept for a starship,” James says.

    A beam sail is like a regular sail — “envision it as a giant umbrella, maybe 100 meters across,” says Gregory — pushed with microwave beams, instead of wind, to extremely high speeds. Beam sails are still in the experimental phase, and far more tests will be necessary on Earth and in space before we know if they can propel an object across the galaxy. Even Jemison admits that the hundred-year estimate is kind of a tease — it’s more about figuring out the physics than building the Enterprise.

    But Gregory Benford likes to remind us of how greatly we underestimate the pace of change. “Thomas Jefferson said in 1812 that it will take 1,000 years for the republic to reach the Pacific. He never envisioned that 57 years later, a train would run all the way to San Francisco.”

    http://www.studio360.org/story/how-to-fly-alpha-centauri/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Will sci-fi save us?

    What does today’s sci-fi mean for our real-life future? Cyberpunk author Neal Stephenson argues that it’s time to get over our love of dystopia. A class at MIT searches sci-fi classics for technologies they can invent right now, although maybe they shouldn’t. Geoengineers take a tip from Carl Sagan – who saw a green future for Mars – to see if we can save Earth. And we meet some scientists who think that if we ever want to see the stars, we’d better start building the starship.

    http://www.studio360.org/story/will-scifi-save-us/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. 5by5 | CMD+Space #103: Everything in Moderation, with Matt Haughey

    This week Myke is joined by Matt Haughey. They talk about Metafliter’s past, it’s troubles with advertising, accidental crowd-funding and the site’s future.

    Make sure that you stick around to the end of the show for a big announcement.

    http://5by5.tv/cmdspace/103

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Warren Ellis: Comedy, Dystopian America & The Space Age - YouTube

    Watch more videos on http://iai.tv .In "Our Hopeless Future", novelist, fantasist and icon of British comics Warren Ellis discusses dystopian America, the sp…

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pngrp3CMxvU

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  6. Is NASA Ready to Make the Leap to a Manned Mission to Mars?

    What technologies, budget, and partners would NASA needed for a successful manned mission to Mars?

    http://sciencefriday.com/segment/06/13/2014/is-nasa-ready-to-make-the-leap-to-a-manned-mission-to-mars.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Astronomycast 145: Interstellar Travel

    In science fiction it’s easy to hop into your spaceship and blast off for other stars. But the true distances between stars, and the limits of relativity make interstellar travel almost impossible with our current technology. What would it really take to travel from star to star, exploring the galaxy?

    http://www.astronomycast.com/space-flight/ep-145-interstellar-travel/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. The 2014 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Selling Space

    Space exploration is entering a new era. Dozens of aerospace companies have emerged in recent years, all with the goal of commercializing space as never before. From serving NASA’s cargo needs to sending tourists on space vacations to mining asteroids for profit, this next generation of entrepreneurs, and not NASA, may be the ones who transform space into our backyard, possibly creating the first-ever trillionaires.

    In this podcast, listen in on this discussion between a panel of entrepreneurs and space historians, including panelists Wanda M. Austin, president and CEO of The Aerospace Corporation; Michael Gold, director of DC operations and Business Growth at Bigelow Aerospace; John Logsdon, professor emeritus of Space Policy and International Affairs at George Washington University; Elliot Pulham, chief executive officer of the Space Foundation; Tom Shelley, president of Space Adventures Ltd; and Robert Walker, executive chairman of Wexler and Walker Public Policy Associates. Host and moderator Neil deGrasse Tyson, Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium, led this lively conversation on what may be our real future in space.

    The 2014 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate took place at the Museum on Wednesday, March 19, 2014.

    http://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/the-2014-isaac-asimov-memorial-debate-selling-space-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Bon Voyage, Voyager: Old Friends Take Stock

    Long gone, but never forgotten, Voyager 1 is about 12 billion miles from home and now sailing through interstellar space, scientists were thrilled to confirm in 2013. The spacecraft carries with it a generation’s dreams.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Astronaut Chris Hadfield on Why Gravity Needed More Adult Diapers | Underwire | Wired.com

    In the latest episode of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast astronaut Chris Hadfield discusses his love of science fiction.

    Astronaut Chris Hadfield is the first Canadian to walk in space, and also the first Canadian to command the International Space Station. A YouTube video of him singing the David Bowie song “Space Oddity” in zero-g has been viewed almost 20 million times. He’s also the author of the bestselling new memoir An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth. But before all that, he was just a kid reading science fiction.

    “I read it all kind of voraciously,” Hadfield says in Episode 100 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast. “Just letting those good writers help my imagination stretch and soar.”

    Early pulp adventures taught him that desperate astronauts might achieve vectored thrust by venting their water tanks into space, an idea he kept in the back of his mind on his own missions. And he’s always delighted when film and television portrayals capture the reality of space travel, such as the scene in 2001: A Space Odyssey when an astronaut goes on a space walk.

    “In 2001 they guessed right,” says Hadfield. “They did an accurate portrayal of the sense of aloneness, and the sounds, and what it would really be like. And it helped it be slightly more familiar.”

    Listen to our complete interview with Chris Hadfield in Episode 100 of Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy (above), in which he discusses why Gravity needed more adult diapers, why the dinosaurs should’ve had a space program, and what to do if you ever find a snake in your cockpit. Then stick around after the interview as frequent guest geek Matt London joins hosts John Joseph Adams and David Barr Kirtley to celebrate 100 episodes of Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy.

    http://www.wired.com/underwire/2013/12/geeks-guide-chris-hadfield/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

Page 1 of 11Older