Tagged with “space” (95) activity chart

  1. Astronomycast 145: Interstellar Travel

    In science fiction it’s easy to hop into your spaceship and blast off for other stars. But the true distances between stars, and the limits of relativity make interstellar travel almost impossible with our current technology. What would it really take to travel from star to star, exploring the galaxy?

    http://www.astronomycast.com/space-flight/ep-145-interstellar-travel/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 2 weeks ago

  2. The 2014 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Selling Space

    Space exploration is entering a new era. Dozens of aerospace companies have emerged in recent years, all with the goal of commercializing space as never before. From serving NASA’s cargo needs to sending tourists on space vacations to mining asteroids for profit, this next generation of entrepreneurs, and not NASA, may be the ones who transform space into our backyard, possibly creating the first-ever trillionaires.

    In this podcast, listen in on this discussion between a panel of entrepreneurs and space historians, including panelists Wanda M. Austin, president and CEO of The Aerospace Corporation; Michael Gold, director of DC operations and Business Growth at Bigelow Aerospace; John Logsdon, professor emeritus of Space Policy and International Affairs at George Washington University; Elliot Pulham, chief executive officer of the Space Foundation; Tom Shelley, president of Space Adventures Ltd; and Robert Walker, executive chairman of Wexler and Walker Public Policy Associates. Host and moderator Neil deGrasse Tyson, Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium, led this lively conversation on what may be our real future in space.

    The 2014 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate took place at the Museum on Wednesday, March 19, 2014.

    http://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/podcasts/the-2014-isaac-asimov-memorial-debate-selling-space-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio 4 weeks ago

  3. Bon Voyage, Voyager: Old Friends Take Stock

    Long gone, but never forgotten, Voyager 1 is about 12 billion miles from home and now sailing through interstellar space, scientists were thrilled to confirm in 2013. The spacecraft carries with it a generation’s dreams.

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 months ago

  4. Astronaut Chris Hadfield on Why Gravity Needed More Adult Diapers | Underwire | Wired.com

    In the latest episode of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast astronaut Chris Hadfield discusses his love of science fiction.

    Astronaut Chris Hadfield is the first Canadian to walk in space, and also the first Canadian to command the International Space Station. A YouTube video of him singing the David Bowie song “Space Oddity” in zero-g has been viewed almost 20 million times. He’s also the author of the bestselling new memoir An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth. But before all that, he was just a kid reading science fiction.

    “I read it all kind of voraciously,” Hadfield says in Episode 100 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast. “Just letting those good writers help my imagination stretch and soar.”

    Early pulp adventures taught him that desperate astronauts might achieve vectored thrust by venting their water tanks into space, an idea he kept in the back of his mind on his own missions. And he’s always delighted when film and television portrayals capture the reality of space travel, such as the scene in 2001: A Space Odyssey when an astronaut goes on a space walk.

    “In 2001 they guessed right,” says Hadfield. “They did an accurate portrayal of the sense of aloneness, and the sounds, and what it would really be like. And it helped it be slightly more familiar.”

    Listen to our complete interview with Chris Hadfield in Episode 100 of Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy (above), in which he discusses why Gravity needed more adult diapers, why the dinosaurs should’ve had a space program, and what to do if you ever find a snake in your cockpit. Then stick around after the interview as frequent guest geek Matt London joins hosts John Joseph Adams and David Barr Kirtley to celebrate 100 episodes of Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy.

    http://www.wired.com/underwire/2013/12/geeks-guide-chris-hadfield/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 3 months ago

  5. Dark Side of the Earth

    200 miles above Earth’s surface, astronaut Dave Wolf — rocketing through the blackness of Earth’s shadow at 5 miles a second — floated out of the Mir Space Station on his very first spacewalk. In this short, he describes the extremes of light and dark in space, relives a heart-pounding close call, and shares one of the most tranquil moments of his life.

    http://www.radiolab.org/story/242184-dark-side-earth/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 5 months ago

  6. Science Goes to the Movies: ‘Gravity’

    With the astronaut flick Gravity dominating box offices and dinner table conversation, Science Friday brings in the experts to fact-check. In our first installment of "Science Goes to the Movies," astronauts Jeffrey Hoffman and Don Pettit answer your Gravity questions and explore the real risks of spaceflight.

    —Huffduffed by adactio 5 months ago

  7. Chris Hadfield’s Lessons from Life in Orbit

    Retired astronaut Chris Hadfield, author of the new book An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth, has flown three space missions, including 144 days on the International Space Station. Hadfield talks about life in zero gravity, his one fear while in orbit, and how he went from test pilot to astronaut.

    —Huffduffed by adactio 5 months ago

  8. Peter Schwartz: The Starships ARE Coming - The Long Now

    We now know, Schwartz began, that nearly all of the billions of stars in our galaxy have planets. If we can master interstellar travel, "there’s someplace to go." Our own solar system is pretty boring—-one planet is habitable, the rest are "like Antarctica without ice" or worse.

    So this last year a number of researchers and visionaries have begun formal investigation into the practicalities of getting beyond our own solar system. It is an extremely hard problem, for two primary reasons—-the enormous energy required to drive far and fast, and the vast amount of time it takes to get anywhere even at high speed.

    The energy required can be thought of in three ways. 1) Impossible—-what most scientists think. 2) Slow. 3) Faster than light (FTL). Chemical rockets won’t do at all. Nuclear fission rockets may suffice for visiting local planets, but it would take at least fusion to get to the planets of other stars. Schwartz showed Adam Crowl’s scheme for a Bussard Ramjet using interstellar ions for a fusion drive. James Benford (co-author of the book on all this, Starship Century) makes the case for sail ships powered by lasers based in our Solar System.

    As for faster-than-light, that requires "reinventing physics." Physics does keep doing that (as with the recent discovery of "dark energy"). NASA has one researcher, Harold White, investigating the potential of microscopic wormholes for superluminal travel.

    Standard-physics travel will require extremely long voyages, much longer than a human lifetime. Schwartz suggested four options. 1) Generational ships—-whole mini-societies commit to voyages that only their descendents will complete. 2) Sleep ships—-like in the movie "Avatar," travelers go into hibernation. 3) Relativistic ships—-at near the speed of light, time compresses, so that travelers may experience only 10 years while 100 years pass back on Earth. 4) Download ships—-"Suppose we learn how to copy human consciousness into some machine-like device. Such ‘iPersons’ would be able to control an avatar that could function in environments inhospitable to biological humans. They would not be limited to Earthlike planets."

    Freeman Dyson has added an important idea, that interstellar space may be full of objects—-comets and planets and other things unattached to stars. They could be used for fuel, water, even food. "Some of the objects may be alive." Dyson notes that, thanks to island-hopping, Polynesians explored the Pacific long before Europeans crossed the Atlantic. We might get to the stars by steps.

    Futurist Schwartz laid out four scenarios of the potential for star travel in the next 300 years, building on three population scenarios. By 2300 there could be 36 billion people, if religious faith drives large families. Or, vast wealth might make small families and long life so much the norm that there are only 2.3 billion people on Earth. One harsh scenario has 9 billion people using up the Earth.

    Thus his four starship scenarios… 1) "Stuck in the Mud"—-we can’t or won’t muster the ability to travel far. 2) "God’s Galaxy"—-the faithful deploy their discipline to mount interstellar missions to carry the Word to the stars; they could handle generational ships. 3) "Escape from a Dying Planet"—-to get lots of people to new worlds and new hope would probably require sleep ships. 4) "Trillionaires in Space"—-the future likes of Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and Richard Branson will have the means and desire to push the envelope all the way, employing relativistic and download ships or even faster-than-light travel.

    Schwartz concluded that there are apparently many paths that can get us to the stars. In other words, "Galactic civilization is almost inevitable."

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02013/sep/17/starships-are-coming/

    —Huffduffed by adactio 5 months ago

  9. Science Goes to the Movies: ‘Gravity’

    With the astronaut flick Gravity dominating box offices and dinner table conversation, Science Friday brings in the experts to fact-check. In our first installment of "Science Goes to the Movies," astronauts Jeffrey Hoffman and Don Pettit answer your Gravity questions and explore the real risks of spaceflight.

    —Huffduffed by adactio 5 months ago

  10. Episode 57: Digital and Physical things, with Jim Coudal

    On this special episode Myke is joined by Jim Coudal. They discuss blogging at coudal.com, The Deck and Field Notes.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda 8 months ago

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