Lukelux / collective / tags / innovation

Tagged with “innovation” (29) activity chart

  1. Mariana Mazzucato - The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Private vs. Public Sector Myths

    Where do the boldest innovations, with the deepest consequences for society, come from?

    Many business leaders, entrepreneurs, and libertarians claim that the private sector leads the way always, and government at best follows by decades and at worst impedes the process with bureaucratic regulations.

    Mariana Mazzucato proves otherwise. Many of the most profound innovations—from the Internet and GPS to nanotech and biotech —had their origin in government programs developed specifically to explore innovations that might eventually attract private sector interest. Ignoring this entrepreneurial risk taking role of government has fuelled a very different story about governments role in the economy, and also fuelled the dysfunctional dynamic whereby risk is socialised—with tax payers absorbing the greatest risk—- but rewards are not. Mazzucato will argue that socialization of risk, privatization of rewards is not only bad for the future of innovation eco-systems but also a key driver of inequality. What to do about it?

    Mazzucato is a professor of the Economics of Innovation at Sussex University and author of The Entrepreneurial State: debunking private vs. public sector myths.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02014/mar/24/entrepreneurial-state-debunking-private-vs-public-sector-myths/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Michael Nelson on digital preservation

    Michael Nelson, Associate Professor at Old Dominion University, developed, along with colleagues at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, “Memento,” a technical framework aimed at better integrating the current and the past web. In the past, archiving history involved collecting tangible things such as letters and newspapers. Now, Nelson points out, the web has become a primary medium with no serious preservation system in place. He discusses how the web is stuck in the perpetual now, making it difficult to view past information. The goal behind Memento, according to Nelson, is to create an all-inclusive Internet archive system, which will allow users to engage in a form of Internet time travel, surpassing the current archive systems such as the Wayback Machine.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2011/09/06/michael-nelson/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. James Burke – 1 + 1 = 3

    Journalist and academic Aleks Krotoski presents the second of her three guest curated events on the theme of ‘Connections’.

    James Burke takes a sideways look at the connective nature of innovation and its social effects. Two ideas come together to produce something that is greater than the sum of the parts. The result is almost a surprise (in the way, for instance, the first typewriters boosted the divorce rate!).

    Innovation has usually attempted to solve some aspect of the problem with which we have lived for two million tool-using years: scarcity. As a result, our institutions, value systems, modes of thought and behaviour have all been shaped by the fact that there’s never been enough of everything to go around.

    However, thanks to the internet and a radically-accelerated rate of connective, inter-disciplinary innovation, we may be on the verge of solving the problem of scarcity once and for all. In ways that may really surprise us. What will abundance do to us? And how should we prepare for it?

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Neal Stephenson on Stranger Than Fiction

    Welcome to Stranger Than Fiction, a new six-episode podcast from Slate, the New America Foundation, and Arizona State University. Each week, Tim Wu—a Future Tense fellow at New America, the author of The Master Switch, and a professor at Columbia Law School—talks to a contemporary science fiction writer about whether we’re living in the future.

    In the debut episode, Wu talks to Neal Stephenson, the award-winning science fiction author of Snow Crash, The Diamond Age, Cryptonomicon, and more. They discuss the purpose of science fiction, geek culture, and whether—contrary to our constant hand-wringing about “everything changing so fast”—innovation has really slowed down.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. The Fat Duck | Heston Blumenthal | Cooking Statement

    ‘Molecular gastronomy’ was coined in the 1991 as a suitably serious-sounding term that would help pave the way for a conference on culinary science.

    Since then, however, it has become a convenient, catch-all-phrase to describe science-driven cooking. It explains little and misleads a lot.

    In 2006 Heston was involved in producing a statement to explain how his motivations and intentions weren’t confined to the sphere of molecular gastronomy.

    ONE Three basic principles guide our cooking: excellence, openness, and integrity.
    We are motivated above all by an aspiration to excellence. We wish to work with ingredients of the finest quality, and to realize the full potential of the food we choose to prepare, whether it is a single shot of espresso or a multicourse tasting menu.

    TWO Our cooking values tradition, builds on it, and along with tradition is part of the ongoing evolution of our craft.
    The world’s culinary traditions are collective, cumulative inventions, a heritage created by hundreds of generations of cooks. Tradition is the base which all cooks who aspire to excellence must know and master. Our open approach builds on the best that tradition has to offer.

    THREE We embrace innovation - new ingredients, techniques, appliances, information, and ideas - whenever it can make a real contribution to our cooking.
    We do not pursue novelty for its own sake. We may use modern thickeners, sugar substitutes, enzymes, liquid nitrogen, sous-vide, dehydration, and other nontraditional means, but these do not define our cooking. They are a few of the many tools that we are fortunate to have available as we strive to make delicious and stimulating dishes.

    FOUR We believe that cooking can affect people in profound ways, and that a spirit of collaboration and sharing is essential to true progress in developing this potential.
    The act of eating engages all the senses as well as the mind. Preparing and serving food could therefore be the most complex and comprehensive of the performing arts. To explore the full expressive potential of food and cooking, we collaborate with scientists, from food chemists to psychologists, with artisans and artists (from all walks of the performing arts), architects, designers, industrial engineers. We also believe in the importance of collaboration and generosity among cooks: a readiness to share ideas and information, together with full acknowledgment of those who invent new techniques and dishes.

    http://www.thefatduck.co.uk/Heston-Blumenthal/Cooking-Statement/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. How Cafe Culture Helped Make Good Ideas Happen : NPR

    It is easy to talk about great ideas as if they were light-bulb moments —€” sudden epiphanies where everything comes together for you. But Steven Johnson, author of Where Good Ideas Come From, says the great ideas of the past have taken a lot more hanging out than you’d expect.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=130595037&ps=rs

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Searching For The Origins of Creativity : NPR

    From Darwin’s theory of evolution to the invention of YouTube, what factors play a role in innovation? Is there such a thing as an idea whose time has come? Steven Johnson, author of Where Good Ideas Come From, talks about great conceptual advances and how to foster creativity.

    http://www.npr.org/2010/12/24/132311762/Searching-For-The-Origins-of-Creativity?ps=rs

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. TED Radio Hour: Steven Johnson: Is the “Eureka” Moment a Myth? : NPR

    Author Steven Johnson says that ideas don’t come in a stroke of genius — they emerge from a network of people, places and real-world constraints.

    http://www.npr.org/2012/06/08/154457665/is-the-eureka-moment-a-myth

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. TED Radio Hour: Matt Ridley: What Happens When Ideas Have Sex? : NPR

    Our planet’s biodiversity comes from the adaptation of sexual reproduction —€” the ability to recombine the DNA of two parents into a wholly unique organism. Science writer Matt Ridley says that ideas reproduce just like the humans who think them up.

    http://www.npr.org/2012/06/08/154452486/what-happens-when-ideas-have-sex

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Saul Griffith on Living the Examined Life and Flying Giant Kites (Part One)

    After becoming a renewable energy entrepreneur (think massive kites), Saul Griffith started wondering about the greenness of his own life—so he started counting. The exercise became an exploration, which resulted in the website WattzOn.com, a powerful opensource tool for personal impact calculation. Using the Embodied Energy Database, you can finally determine “the impact of wearing underwear versus taking holiday in Europe.” Griffith explains how WattzOn works (and how you can help perfect it), and why we miss the point when we obsess over

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

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