Tagged with “speech” (11) activity chart

  1. The Digital Human: Voice

    Aleks Krotoski charts how digital culture is moulding modern living. Each week join technology journalist Aleks Krotoski as she goes beyond the latest gadget or web innovation to understand what sort of world we’re creating with our ‘always on’ lives.

    Aleks Krotoski asks if our voices are being drown out by the cacophony of content online.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/dh

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  2. How Do You Construct A Voice?

    Speech scientist Rupal Patel creates customized synthetic voices that enable people who can’t speak to communicate in a unique voice that embodies their personality.

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  3. Gabriella Coleman on the ethics of free software

    Gabriella Coleman, the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy in the Art History and Communication Studies Department at McGill University, discusses her new book, “Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking,” which has been released under a Creative Commons license.

    Coleman, whose background is in anthropology, shares the results of her cultural survey of free and open source software (F/OSS) developers, the majority of whom, she found, shared similar backgrounds and world views. Among these similarities were an early introduction to technology and a passion for civil liberties, specifically free speech.

    Coleman explains the ethics behind hackers’ devotion to F/OSS, the social codes that guide its production, and the political struggles through which hackers question the scope and direction of copyright and patent law. She also discusses the tension between the overtly political free software movement and the “politically agnostic” open source movement, as well as what the future of the hacker movement may look like.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2013/01/08/gabriella-coleman-2/

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  4. Steve Jobs Speech at Stanford University

    Drawing from some of the most pivotal points in his life, Steve Jobs, chief executive officer and co-founder of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios,…

    http://www.archive.org/details/SteveJobsSpeechAtStanfordUniversity

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  5. The Net Delusion: Does free information mean free people?

    At the start of the twenty-first century we were promised that the internet would liberate the world. We could come together as never before, and from Iran’s ‘twitter revolution’ to Facebook ‘activism’, technological innovation would spread democracy to oppressed peoples everywhere. We couldn’t have been more wrong. Morozov destroys this myth, arguing that ‘internet freedom’ is an illusion, and that technology has failed to help protect people’s rights. Not only that – in many cases the internet is actually helping authoritarian regimes. From China to Russia to Iran, oppressive governments are using cyberspace to stifle dissent: planting clandestine propaganda, employing sophisticated digital censorship and using online surveillance. We are all being manipulated in more subtle ways too – becoming pacified by the net, instead of truly engaging. This event marks the publication of Evgeny Morozov’s new book The Net Delusion: How Not to Liberate The World.

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  6. Oliver Sacks

    Neurologist Oliver Sacks tells stories of people who manage to navigate the world and communicate, despite losing what many consider indispensable senses and abilities: the power of speech, the ability to recognize faces, the sense of three-dimensional space, the ability to read, and to see. In The Mind’s Eye he considers the fundamental questions: How do we see? How do we think?

    http://www.wnyc.org/shows/lopate/2010/oct/27/oliver-sacks/

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  7. Radiolab: Words

    http://www.wnyc.org/shows/radiolab/episodes/2010/09/10

    It’s almost impossible to imagine a world without words. But in this hour of Radiolab, we try to do just that. We speak to a woman who taught a 27-year-old man the first words of his life, and we hear a firsthand account of what it feels like to have the language center of your brain wiped out by a stroke.

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  8. The Critical Early Years of Language Development: You Can’t Say What you Don’t Hear

    Dr. Anna Meyer, UCSF Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, explores how hearing and speech develop and why the early years are so critical.

    http://uctv.tv/search-details.aspx?showID=16725

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  9. WNYC’s Leonard Lopate: Please Explain - How We Read

    If it comes to you easily, being able to read is easy to take for granted. But reading is an extraordinarily complex process, one that researchers are still working to understand fully. On today’s Please Explain we look at the science of reading. Dr. Sally E. Shaywitz and Dr. Bennett A. Shaywitz are professors in Learning Development at the Yale University School of Medicine and Co-Directors of the Yale Center for Learning.

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  10. Tech Talk

    A discussion with John Buckman, the founder of bookmooch.com, an online community of book-swappers; ways to cut your cable, phone and Internet bills; and new tools that let your computer read to you.

    http://www.nytimes.com/ref/technology/techtalk.html

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