Tagged with “cbc” (29) activity chart

  1. Personalized Genomics

    Personalized genetic screening tests are now commercially available. Are they a tool for a disease-free future or a white elephant? Medical geneticists Cynthia Kenyon, Muin Khoury, and Nobel Laureate Harold Varmus discuss the science and the issues, in a forum moderated by former NBC correspondent Charles Sabine. Recorded at the Chan Centre at the University of British Columbia in March 2009.

    —Huffduffed by norelpref

  2. October 29th: The Antikythera Mechanism from CBC Radio: Editor’s Choice

    The Antikythera Mechanism was discovered a hundred years ago in the wreckage of a 2000-year-old ship. For much of the last century, researchers, like Dr. Daryn Lehoux in the Classics Department at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, have been trying to figure out what this complex mechanical device can do. Dr. Lehoux spoke with host Bob MacDonald on Quirks and Quarks.

    —Huffduffed by norelpref

  3. September 28th: A Rare Violin and 50 Jobs in 50 States

    Last week, fourteen lucky musicians won the privilege to play a rare instrument for three years. One of those instruments - a violin - has an unusual story. Owner Greg Cook told that story to Carol Off on As it Happens. Then, we’ll hear about how twenty-seven-year-old Daniel Seddiqui spent the last 50 weeks traveling across the 50 U.S. States and working 50 different jobs. Last week, he spoke with Carol Off while he was spending the final week of his vocational voyage in Napa.

    —Huffduffed by norelpref

  4. Public Apology: Good PR or Powerful Healing?

    Public apologies are becoming more common. Many jurisdictions have passed legislation protecting governments, corporations and individuals, who offer sincere apologies, from legal liability. A Calgary community seminar examines public apologies, the strategies behind them and their consequences. Co-sponsored by IDEAS and the Calgary Institute of the Humanities at the University of Calgary.

    —Huffduffed by norelpref

  5. August 13th: Body Image in India

    Today on the show, we have two items from CBC reporter Natasha Fatah that explore body image in India. The country’s skyrocketing economy is racing to catch up with the West and the rise of disposable income amongst the new middle class has led to high demand in some unusual industries, such as cosmetic surgery. Along with the desire to change body shape in India, there’s a perceived stigma attached to skin tone. It’s a sensitive subject that’s now being challenged.

    —Huffduffed by norelpref

  6. You Are “Pre-Diseased” - Part One

    Why wait until you are diagnosed with cancer, if you can hunt it down before it could kill you? Why not get a simple high tech CT scan to see if you are harbouring signs of pre-disease in your heart, your lungs, your breasts or your bowels? Those are the questions that dog Health Researcher Alan Cassels as he voyages inside the world of cancer screening, taking him from his own doctor’s office to the world’s biggest medical meeting.

    —Huffduffed by norelpref

  7. Wachtel on the Arts - William Kentridge

    William Kentridge is South Africa’s most renowned living artist, famous for his charcoal drawings and animated films that address the social and political realities of South Africa, both during and after apartheid. Eleanor Wachtel, arts journalist and host of Writers & Company, talks to William Kentridge about growing up as the child of anti-apartheid lawyers, his struggle to find his way as an artist, and how South Africa has changed since the end of apartheid.

    —Huffduffed by norelpref

  8. Aboriginals and New Canadians: The Missing Conversation

    The words, "We are a Metis nation" open John Ralston Saul’s recent book, A Fair Country. In the 2009 UBC-Laurier Institution Multiculturalism Lecture, he argues that aboriginal values have fundamentally shaped the character of Canadian society.

    —Huffduffed by norelpref

  9. June 30th: Toys for Grown-ups Who Were Kids in the 80’s and The Dangerous World of Butterflies

    Let’s go back to the 1980s when Saturday morning cartoons were little more than extended toy commercials. The Transformers, G.I. Joe, He-Man and all the rest found a way to keep the little tikes amused while pushing the latest action figures. We’ll also hear about author Peter Laufer. Weary of writing about his usual topics of politics and war, he made an off-hand comment that his next book would be about "butterflies and flowers."

    —Huffduffed by norelpref

  10. June 1st: James Lovelock on The Current

    Today on the podcast, I’ve got some good news and some bad news. The good news is that the Earth is finding a way to heal itself. The bad news is that it’s likely going to sacrifice a lot of us to do it. When it comes to climate change, we can try to reverse it, slow it or mitigate it but a British scientist named Dr. James Lovelock says that there’s no gratitude in green. Forget the mitigation. Start working on adaptation fast.

    —Huffduffed by norelpref

Page 1 of 3Older