GonzaloGM / collective / tags / school

Tagged with “school” (19) activity chart

  1. Arab Israeli Celebrity Chef Aims To Foster Peace Through Cooking : The Salt : NPR

    Nof Atamna-Ismaeel, an Arab Israeli, is the latest winner of the Israeli reality cooking show Master Chef. She plans to open a cooking school to bring Arabs and Israelis together at the table.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/04/09/301028044/arab-israeli-celebrity-chef-aims-to-foster-peace-through-cooking

    —Huffduffed by adactio 2 weeks ago

  2. Bjarke Ingels: An Architect For A Moment Or An Era? : NPR

    Cartooning was his passion as a kid, and he enrolled in the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture to become better at drawing backgrounds. Now, some call Ingels a "starchitect," because his challenging designs are getting built.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/01/03/259117207/bjarke-ingels-an-architect-for-a-moment-or-an-era

    —Huffduffed by briansuda 3 months ago

  3. Malcolm Gladwell: Secrets of the Underdog’s Success

    Why do underdogs sometimes end up leading the pack? Malcolm Gladwell explores this question in his latest book, "David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants." The bestselling author joins us in studio for a discussion about turning your disadvantage into a winning advantage.

    http://www.kqed.org/a/forum/R201310091000

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 6 months ago

  4. In Conversation: Jaron Lanier and James Bridle On Who Owns the Future?

    Jaron Lanier is a technology inventor and philosopher who has been dubbed the prophet of the digital age. He coined the phrases ‘Virtual Reality’ and ‘digital Maoism’. His last book, You Are Not A Gadget, was a hugely influential and hotly debated critique of the ‘hive mind’. Here he talks about his new book, Who Owns the Future?, with artist and writer James Bridle.



    Digital technologies dawned with the promise that they would bring us all greater economic stability and power. That utopian image has stuck. But, Lanier argues, the efficiencies brought by digi-techs are having the effect of concentrating wealth while reducing overall growth. He predicts that, as more industries are transformed by digital technologies, huge waves of permanent unemployment are likely to follow those already sweeping through many creative industries.



    But digital hubs are designed on the principle that people don’t get paid for sharing. Every time we apply for a loan, update Facebook, use our credit cards, post pictures on Instagram or search on Google, we work for free says Lanier. He argues that artificial intelligence over a network can be understood as a massive accounting fraud that ruins markets. Past technological revolutions rewarded people with new wealth and capabilities. He will explain why, without that reward, the middle classes - who form the basis of democracy as he sees it - are threatened, placing the future of human dignity itself at risk.



    Lanier discusses his analysis of the deep links between democracy and capitalism, and shares his thoughts for how humanity can find a new vision for the future.

 



    This event was part of The School of Life’s ‘In Conversation’ series and took place at Conway Hall on 6th March 2013.

    Audio rip, original here under CC by-nc: http://vimeo.com/61418990

    —Huffduffed by adactio 8 months ago

  5. 213: Longevity, Integration, Disposal | Spark with Nora Young | CBC Radio

    This week on Spark - What happens to our digital stuff when web services shutdown? We take a look at data longevity online. Also, virtually staging our homes, what to do with e-waste, and integrative thinking in the classroom.

    http://www.cbc.ca/spark/episodes/2013/04/12/213-data-longevity-integrative-thinking-virtual-staging/

    —Huffduffed by adactio one year ago

  6. 3620 Podcast: F is Not For Phreak

    We celebrated our one month anniversary a few days ago, so it seemed fitting to run with the very first episode that we produced back when we were kicking around ideas for getting the podcast off the ground. It’s a page out of Kevin’s research on the history of hacker culture, which turns to a meditation on the role of telephony and sound in our world. Enjoy!

    Major Thanks…

    The phreak who goes by Mark Bernay is a wonderful and gracious guy for talking with me and for lending me some of his audio to use in this episode. If you want to check out more of his recordings, head over to Phone Trips.

    Music

    • “Real Love” by Delorean (0:00)
    • “Imitosis” by Andrew Bird (2:32 & 8:14)
    • “Dead Media” by Hefner (4:53)
    • “Pick Up the Phone” by Dragonette (9:44)

    http://podcast.asc.upenn.edu/2012/10/episode-6-f-is-not-for-phreak/

    —Huffduffed by adactio one year ago

  7. The Extraordinary Food Story of Martha Payne

    Martha Payne (AKA ‘VEG’), nine year old blogger, explains how she triggered a wordwide debate on school food.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/foodprog

    —Huffduffed by adactio one year ago

  8. The Good Part | You Look Nice Today

    NoJackets You’re gonna love it—the guitar does this “Wheeee!” thing while the drums go all “Chukka chukka booda booda.” OK, here it comes. Shhhh! No wait, that’s not it. Almost there, just

    http://youlooknicetoday.com/episode/good-part

    —Huffduffed by merlinmann 2 years ago

  9. Ken Robinson: Rethinking Educational Paradigms

    Celebrated education expert Ken Robinson argues that most "modern" approaches to learning are actually relics of an outdated, industrial-age system. This program was recorded in collaboration with the 2010 Aspen Ideas Festival, on July 8, 2010.

    Sir Ken Robinson is an expert in creativity, innovation, and human resources. He works with governments in Europe, Asia, and the United States, and with international agencies, Fortune 500 companies, and cultural organizations. Robinson led a national commission on creativity, education, and the economy for the UK government and was central in forming a creative- and economic-development strategy as part of the Northern Ireland peace process. Formerly, he was professor of education at the University of Warwick.

    He has received several honorary degrees, the Athena Award from the Rhode Island School of Design, the Peabody Medal, and the Benjamin Franklin Medal from the Royal Society of Arts. He received a knighthood for his services to the arts. His latest book is The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything (Viking, 2009).

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 2 years ago

  10. 21st Century Skills

    The 21st Century Skills Movement seeks to reform education to better prepare students for success in the modern workplace. Those skills include creativity, innovation, critical thinking, communication and collaboration. We’ll talk to some Silicon Valley veterans who are working to help students attain these skills. And we’ll find out why the movement has encountered opposition from some education leaders, who favor an emphasis on core content and knowledge.

    Guests: - Bernie Trilling, author of "21st Century Skills: Learning for Life in Our Times" and former global director of the Oracle Education Foundation - Gregg Witkin, digital media arts teacher at Boynton High School in Campbell - Miguel Salinas, senior manager of Adobe Youth Voices — a global philanthropic initiative that empowers youth from under-served communities with digital media tools so they can comment on their world and share ideas - Randy Nelson, head of artistic development and training at DreamWorks Animation and former dean of Pixar University

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 3 years ago

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