Clampants / tags / mind

Tagged with “mind” (16) activity chart

  1. Carl Zimmer: Unlocking Secrets of the Human Brain

    In his new cover article for National Geographic magazine, science writer Carl Zimmer explores the inner workings of the human mind, and delves into the latest technologies on mapping the brain and finding out what specific neurons do - including one neuron that’s only triggered by pictures of Jennifer Aniston. We talk with Zimmer about how far the science of the mind has come - and how far it still needs to go before we can answer questions about consciousness and free will.

    Host: Michael Krasny

    Guests: Christof Koch, chief science officer, Allen Institute for Brain Science Carl Zimmer, science writer who contributes frequently to National Geographic and The New York Times and three-time winner of the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Journalism Award

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 3 months ago

  2. Science Weekly podcast: the waking nightmare of sleep paralysis

    This week’s edition is dedicated to the little understood phenomenon of "sleep paralysis": the experience of waking from sleep (or waking at the point of entering sleep) and being unable to move. It can be accompanied by hallucinations, fear, the sense of a "presence" in the room and the feeling of crushing pressure on the chest. People who have an episode of sleep paralysis will sometimes attribute it to something paranormal, such as attempted alien abduction.

    Christopher French, professor of psychology at Goldsmiths College London, and film maker Carla MacKinnon came into the studio to discuss The Sleep Paralysis Project where artistic and scientific perspectives on the condition come together to shine a light on this neurological glitch in our normal waking pattern.

    http://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2013/aug/05/podcast-science-weekly-sleep-paralysis

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 5 months ago

  3. Alone Inside

    When the concept of solitary confinement was first implemented in the early 19th century, the idea was not to punish the prisoner, but to give him space to reflect and reform. Two centuries later, despite the growing use of segregation in Canada and the United States, the practice continues to produce very different results. Prisoners who have lived through solitary confinement say the experience is torturous. Freelance journalist Brett Story explores the roots of this practice in North America, and the profound and often devastating impact it has on people who are severed from social contact.

    Guests in order of appearance:

    Susan Rosenberg is a writer, educator, and former political prisoner. Author of the prison memoir An American Radical - Political Prisoner in My Own Country, Rosenberg spent 16 years incarcerated in United States and 11 of those in some form of segregation.

    Gregory McMaster has served 35 years in prison in both the United States and Canada. He is currently held at Fenbrook Institution in Ontario on consecutive life sentences. He has spent a total of 7 years in segregation, most of that time in the U.S.

    Caleb Smith is a Professor of English at Yale University, and author of The Prison and the American Imagination, and most recently, The Oracle and the Curse: A Poetics of Justice from the Revolution to the Civil War.

    Michael Jackson is a Professor of Law at the University of British Columbia and author of, among other books, Prisoners of Isolation: Solitary Confinement in Canada. As a lawyer he has represented prisoners and First Nations in leading cases before the Supreme Court of Canada.

    Lisa Guenther is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. Her most recent book is Solitary Confinement: Social Death and its Afterlives. She also runs a philosophy reading group with prisoners on death row.

    http://www.cbc.ca/ideas/episodes/2013/09/03/alone-inside/index.html

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 7 months ago

  4. To The Best of Our Knowledge: Higher Consciousness

    Suppose neuroscientists map the billions of neural circuits in the human brain….are we any closer to cracking the great existential mysteries - like meaning, purpose or happiness? Scientists, contemplatives and religious thinkers are now exploring the connections between neuroscience and contemplative practice, and creating a new science of mindfulness.

    http://ttbook.org/book/higher-consciousness

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 8 months ago

  5. Michael Shermer on Why People Believe Weird Things

    The editor of Skeptic Magazine, Michael Shermer, delivers a lecture on his book Why People Believe Weird Things.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yxg21F_I5U0

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 9 months ago

  6. The Man Working To Reverse-Engineer Your Brain

    Our brains are filled with billions of neurons. Neuroscientist Sebastian Seung explains how mapping out the connections between those neurons might be the key to understanding the basis of things like personality, memory, perception, ideas and mental illness.

    http://www.npr.org/2012/02/29/147190092/the-man-working-to-reverse-engineer-your-brain

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 2 years ago

  7. Deepak Chopra and physicist Leonard Mlodinow: Science And The Spirit

    Deepak Chopra and physicist Leonard Mlodinow join us to talk science and spirit.

    America was built on science. America was rooted in religion. For 200 years, both thrived. In the last quarter-century, they’ve clashed. And the clash has been costly.

    Can we settle this? Maybe. We’ve got two big figures with us today who have taken on the war of worldviews.

    Man of spirit, Deepak Chopra. Man of science, Leonard Mlodinow. One a giant in the realm of spiritual guidance. One a Stephen Hawking-scale master of physics and the scientific way.

    Both ready to hash it out.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 2 years ago

  8. V. S. Ramachandran - Tales from the Brain

    Drawing on strange and thought-provoking case studies, eminent neurologist V. S. Ramachandran offers unprecedented insight into the evolution of the uniquely human brain in his new book, The Tell-Tale Brain.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 3 years ago

  9. Robot Opera and Immortality

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/2011/03/07/robot-opera

    In the new robot opera, “Death and the Powers,” humans are history. So is flesh and blood- as ‘so over’ as the dinosaurs.

    The high-tech drama, composed by Tod Machover, tells the story of how one eccentric billionaire led the way, by refusing to die. He uploads himself – his mind – into the realm of digital immortality, and leaves his worldly body behind. Machover, known as “America’s most wired composer” and director of the Opera of the Future group at the MIT Media Lab, thinks of his character Simon Powers, as “a combination of Howard Hughes, Walt Disney and Bill Gates,” who rather than wanting to live forever, desired “to leave the world, but leave everything about himself here.”

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 3 years ago

  10. KQED Forum: Constructing Consciousness

    What is consciousness? This primal question has occupied humanity since we gained the language to ask it. In his new book "Self Comes to Mind: Constructing the Conscious Brain," Antonio Damasio investigates how new discoveries in neuroscience can shed light on the evolution and emergence of the conscious self.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 3 years ago

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