Skinny Jeans and Fruity Loops: the Networked Publics of Global Youth Culture

What can we learn about contemporary culture from watching dayglo-clad teenagers dancing geekily in front of their computers in such disparate sites as Brooklyn, Buenos Aires, Johannesburg, and Mexico City? How has the embrace of "new media" by so-called "digital natives" facilitated the formation of transnational, digital publics? More important, what are the local effects of such practices, and why do they seem to generate such hostile responses and anxiety about the future?

Wayne Marshall is an ethnomusicologist, blogger, DJ, and, beginning this year, a Mellon Fellow in Foreign Languages and Literatures at MIT. His research focuses on the production and circulation of popular music, especially across the Americas and in the wider world, and the role that digital technologies are playing in the formation of new notions of community, selfhood, and nationhood.

http://cms.mit.edu/news/2009/11/podcast_skinny_jeans_and_fruit.php

Also huffduffed as…

  1. Skinny Jeans and Fruity Loops: the Networked Publics of Global Youth Culture

    —Huffduffed by olishaw on December 2nd, 2009

  2. Skinny Jeans and Fruity Loops: the Networked Publics of Global Youth Culture

    —Huffduffed by takete on December 8th, 2009

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