Simon Critchley: To Philosophize is to Learn How to Die

English philosopher Simon Critchley, chair and professor of Philosophy at The New School for Social Research, discusses his 2009 New York Times bestseller, The Book of Dead Philosophers.

Starting with Cicero’s axiom, "To philosophize is to learn how to die," Professor Critchley leads us to his conclusion that to die is to learn how to live. The Daily Telegraph called the book "rigorous, profound, and frequently hilarious" and described Critchley as "an engaging and deadpan guide to the metaphysical necropolis" as well as "bracingly serious and properly comic." Date: Fri, 09 Oct 2009 00:00:00 -0700 Location: New York, NY, The New School,

Program and discussion: http://fora.tv/2009/10/09/Simon_Critchley_To_Philosophize_is_to_Learn_How_to_Die

Also huffduffed as…

  1. Simon Critchley: To Philosophize is to Learn How to Die

    —Huffduffed by willoller on November 20th, 2009

  2. Simon Critchley: To Philosophize is to Learn How to Die

    —Huffduffed by mattwiebe on November 26th, 2009

  3. Simon Critchley: To Philosophize is to Learn How to Die

    —Huffduffed by proxpero on February 28th, 2010

  4. Simon Critchley: To Philosophize is to Learn How to Die

    —Huffduffed by nik on September 7th, 2010

  5. Simon Critchley: To Philosophize is to Learn How to Die

    —Huffduffed by adampeters on December 14th, 2010

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