21st Century Skills

The 21st Century Skills Movement seeks to reform education to better prepare students for success in the modern workplace. Those skills include creativity, innovation, critical thinking, communication and collaboration. We’ll talk to some Silicon Valley veterans who are working to help students attain these skills. And we’ll find out why the movement has encountered opposition from some education leaders, who favor an emphasis on core content and knowledge.

Guests: - Bernie Trilling, author of "21st Century Skills: Learning for Life in Our Times" and former global director of the Oracle Education Foundation - Gregg Witkin, digital media arts teacher at Boynton High School in Campbell - Miguel Salinas, senior manager of Adobe Youth Voices — a global philanthropic initiative that empowers youth from under-served communities with digital media tools so they can comment on their world and share ideas - Randy Nelson, head of artistic development and training at DreamWorks Animation and former dean of Pixar University

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  1. 21st Century Skills

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  2. 21st Century Skills

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  3. 21st Century Skills

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  4. 21st Century Skills

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Possibly related…

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    Celebrated education expert Ken Robinson argues that most "modern" approaches to learning are actually relics of an outdated, industrial-age system. This program was recorded in collaboration with the 2010 Aspen Ideas Festival, on July 8, 2010.

    Sir Ken Robinson is an expert in creativity, innovation, and human resources. He works with governments in Europe, Asia, and the United States, and with international agencies, Fortune 500 companies, and cultural organizations. Robinson led a national commission on creativity, education, and the economy for the UK government and was central in forming a creative- and economic-development strategy as part of the Northern Ireland peace process. Formerly, he was professor of education at the University of Warwick.

    He has received several honorary degrees, the Athena Award from the Rhode Island School of Design, the Peabody Medal, and the Benjamin Franklin Medal from the Royal Society of Arts. He received a knighthood for his services to the arts. His latest book is The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything (Viking, 2009).

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 2 years ago

  2. Design Thinking

    In our Trends segment today we’re learning increasingly governments and business are learning how good design, and use of what has come to be known as design thinking, can pay big dividends. Our teacher is Sir George Cox, past Chairman of the UK’s Design Council and author of the Cox Review, on creativity in business. Sir George is here as a guest of the Australian Design Alliance to speak to politicians and business leaders how design can is critical to the economic growth of nations.

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  3. To The Best Of Our Knowledge: Learning Outside The Box

    Big box education is on the way out. Instead, imagine a future with schools of every variety available for mixing and matching, like sushi on a platter. Micro-schools, Waldorf Schools, part-time schools and more. And non-school alternatives like internships and single classes. That’s the future as seen by Matt Hern, an advocate for what he calls de-schooling. In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, learning outside the box. And, redefining normal for kids on the short bus.

    Jonathan Mooney says that "normal" is a social construct, not a medical one. Dan Zanes writes music for children of all ages. Matt Hern advocates alternative education. Michel Piechowski describes the way gifted children experience their lives. Sherman Alexie tries to teach an end to tribalism.

    http://wpr.org/book/080309a.html

    —Huffduffed by Clampants 5 years ago